Camille 2000

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Camille 2000
Camille 2000 - Movie poster.jpg
DVD cover
Directed by Radley Metzger
Produced by Radley Metzger
Written by Michael de Forrest
Starring Daniele Gaubert
Nino Castelnuovo
Eleonora Rossi-Drago
Philippe Forquet
Roberto Bisacco
Music by Piero Piccioni
Cinematography Ennio Guarnieri
Running time 115 minutes

Camille 2000 is a 1969 Italian language film based on the 1852 novel and play La Dame aux Camélias by Alexandre Dumas, fils. It was adapted by Michael DeForrest and directed by Radley Metzger. It stars Danièle Gaubert and Nino Castelnuovo with Eleonora Rossi Drago and Massimo Serato. The film featured a drug use theme not present in the source story. It may have been considered a pornographic film in 1969 but is more of a drama based on the expectations of a man finding the wrong love.

Plot[edit]

Marguerite, a beautiful woman of affairs, falls for the young and promising Armand, but sacrifices her love for him for the sake of his future and reputation.

Cast[edit]

Danièle Gaubert as Marguerite Gautier

Nino Castelnuovo as Armand Duval

Eleonora Rossi Drago as Prudence (credited as Eleonora Rossi-Drago)

Roberto Bisacco as Gastion

Reception[edit]

The film was critically panned and has 17% on Rotten Tomatoes.[1] Roger Ebert summed up the film in his one-star review as thus: "Camille 2000 is shot in color. It is dubbed into English instead of subtitled. It is wide screen. It has a pretty girl in it. Her name is Daniele Gaubert. Whoever painted that big sign in front of the theater has an accurate critical sense. The sign says: "See Daniele Gaubert presented in the nude ... and with great frequency." That captures the essence of Metzger's art."[2] On August 11, 2005, he added the film to his "Most Hated List."[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Camille 2000 at Rotten Tomatoes
  2. ^ Ebert, Roger (1969-10-28). "Camille 2000 Movie Review & Film Summary (1969)". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on 2007-01-10. Retrieved 2013-12-02. 
  3. ^ http://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-journal/eberts-most-hated

See also[edit]

External links[edit]