Camp Quest UK

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Camp Quest UK
Formation 2008
Director Samantha Stein
Website www.camp-quest.org.uk

Camp Quest UK is a British summer camp which aims to promote critical thinking in children.

Overview[edit]

Camp Quest is a non-religious summer camp for children which started in the United States in 1996.[1] After reading about Camp Quest in Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion Samantha Stein volunteered at one and was prompted into starting a similar camp in the UK.[2] Camp Quest UK was started by Stein and a group of volunteers in 2008, supported by a grant from the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science, and hosted its first camp in 2009 in Somerset for children aged 8-17.[1][2][3] The camp is an alternative to traditional faith-based camps such as those run by local churches.[4]

At Camp Quest UK, participants discuss philosophical ideas, learn about subjects such as astronomy, and take part in traditional camp activities.[1] The camp aims to promote co-operation, tolerance, and empathy, and teaches children how to think for themselves on matters such as religion and ethics.[5][6] During the first Camp Quest UK in 2009, attendees were tasked with proving that an invisible unicorn didn't exist; aimed to show that a negative cannot be proven.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Morris, Steven (29 July 2009). "Summer camp offers 'godless' alternative for atheists". The Guardian. Retrieved 13 April 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Sturgess, Kylie. "Philosophising Children And Camp Quest UK – Interview With Samantha Stein". James Randi Educational Foundation. Retrieved 13 April 2014. 
  3. ^ a b Leach, Ben (28 June 2009). "Richard Dawkins launches children's summer camp for atheists". The Telegraph. 
  4. ^ Brennan, Zoe (29 July 2009). "Camp faithless: Is Britain's first atheist summer camp harmless fun or should we be worried?". Daily Mail. Retrieved 13 April 2014. 
  5. ^ Summer camp for atheists (Video). CNN. 3 August 2009. Retrieved 13 April 2014. 
  6. ^ Pigott, Robert (28 July 2009). "Camp offers 'godless alternative'". BBC News. Retrieved 13 April 2014.