Campbell's Platform railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Campbell's Platform
Campbell's-platform.jpg
Location
Place Tan-y-Bwlch
Area Gwynedd
Coordinates 52°57′27″N 3°58′33″W / 52.95746°N 3.97587°W / 52.95746; -3.97587Coordinates: 52°57′27″N 3°58′33″W / 52.95746°N 3.97587°W / 52.95746; -3.97587
Grid reference SH673418
Operations
Managed by Ffestiniog Railway
Owned by Festiniog Railway Company
Platforms 1
History
April 1965 Opened for use by Col Campbell on line under restoration[1]
6 April 1968 Opened as a private halt on the reopened line to Dduallt[1]
Stations on heritage railways in the United Kingdom
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Portal icon UK Railways portal
Plas y Dduallt

Campbell's Platform (grid reference SH673418) is a private, unstaffed halt on the Welsh narrow gauge Ffestiniog Railway, which was built in 1836 to carry dressed slate from Blaenau Ffestiniog to Porthmadog for export by sea. It is 9 miles and 7 chains from Porthmadog and is at 510 feet above sea level.

History[edit]

The halt was established in 1965 to serve Plas Dduallt, a small Welsh Manor House (just below the railway) dating in part from the 15th century, and where Oliver Cromwell is said to have stayed during his campaign against the Royalists of North Wales.

Colonel Andrew Campbell bought the house in 1962 and undertook a complete restoration. Road access to Plas Dduallt is recent and during the 1960s the Colonel kept his own locomotive on a siding by the halt. He ran his own train to and from Tan-y-Bwlch under running powers granted by the Ffestiniog Railway.

The Colonel allowed the use of his outhouses for hostel accommodation for volunteers. He was a licensed explosives handler and as a volunteer he did much of the rock blasting required on the spiral section of the deviation and beyond. A slate seat has been erected at Dduallt in his memory.

Campbell's Platform (named in his honour) is a private halt available for use only by residents and visitors staying at Plas Dduallt. Intending passengers must check with the Ffestiniog Railway Company before embarking on their journey.

Plas Dduallt has been on Most Haunted in its 2008 series for paranormal investigations.[2]

Between Campbell's platform and Tan-y-Bwlch is Coed-y-Bleiddiau cottage, a private residence that was built c1860 for the Ffestiniog Railway's Inspector of the Line. The cottage is over half a mile by steep footpath from the nearest road, and in the 1930s it was used as a holiday home by several families, including that of Kim Philby the Russian spy. This cottage also has its own private railway platform, which displays a name board. However, this is not available for public use, and the location features on the map in the Traveller's Guide, but not on the company web.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Butt (1995), page 52
  2. ^ [1]
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0508-1. OCLC 60251199. 
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0086-1. OCLC 22311137. 
  • Boyd, James I.C. (1975) [1959]. The Festiniog Railway 1800 - 1974; Vol. 1 - History and Route. Blandford: The Oakwood Press. ISBN 0-8536-1167-X. OCLC 2074549. 
  • Boyd, James I.C. (1975) [1959]. The Festiniog Railway 1800 - 1974; Vol. 2 - Locomotives and Rolling Stock; Quarries and Branches: Rebirth 1954-74. Blandford: The Oakwood Press. ISBN 0-8536-1168-8. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Brian Hollingsworth: Ffestiniog Adventure - The Festiniog Railway's Deviation Project.
  • Ffestiniog Railway Company: Traveller's Guide.

External links[edit]

Preceding station Heritage Railways  Heritage railways Following station
Tan-y-Bwlch   Ffestiniog Railway   Dduallt