Campeonato Brasileiro Série C

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Campeonato Brasileiro Série C
Country  Brazil
Confederation CONMEBOL
Founded 1981
Number of teams 20
Levels on pyramid 3
Promotion to Série B
Relegation to Série D
Current champions Santa Cruz
(2013)
Most championships Atlético Goianiense (2 titles)
TV partners TV Brasil
Website http://www.cbf.com.br/seriec
2014 Campeonato Brasileiro Série C

The Campeonato Brasileiro Série C is the third division of Brazilian football.

Unlike the first and second divisions, the Série C is not played in a double round robin system, arguably because many participating teams lack the financial conditions to travel long distances. Thus, the tournament is organized in regional groups and the table prevents teams from distant states to play each other in the initial rounds.

Until 2008, any professional team could apply, but only 64 teams would take part in the tournament. The teams that had been relegated from Série B in the previous year were joined by teams qualified for each federation state. Qualification rules varied, some federations used the state tournaments as qualification tournaments, others organized exclusive qualification tournaments to the Série C.

Beginning in 2009, Série C was reduced from 64 teams to 20 and a new Campeonato Brasileiro Série D is the qualifier for Brazilian league football. Currently, the division is composed of four teams relegated from Série B, four teams promoted from Série D and twelve teams that were not relegated or promoted in the previous Série C.

Current clubs - 2014[edit]

History and past champions[edit]

Official champions[edit]

The Campeonato Brasileiro has existed ever since 1971. However, there have been many years when no third division tournament took place. In most cases it was because the two elite divisions had too many clubs (in 1979, for instance, 94 teams contested the first division). The following table shows the winners and runners-up of the Série C tournaments played as from 1981, according to the Brazilian Football Confederation:[1]

Year Winner Score Runner-up Comments
1981
Details
Olaria
 RJ
4 − 0
0 − 1
Santo Amaro
 PE(1)
1982–1987 Not held
1988
Details
União São João
 SP
1 − 1
2 − 2
Esportivo
 MG
União São João declared champions due to more points scored during the championship.
1989 Not held
1990
Details
Atlético Goianiense
 GO
0 − 0
0 − 0
América
 MG
Atlético Goianiense won 3-2 on penalties.
1991 Not held
1992
Details
Tuna Luso
 PA
0 − 2
3 − 1
Fluminense de Feira
 BA
Tuna Luso declared champions due to more points scored during the championship.
1993 Not held
1994
Details
Novorizontino
 SP
1 − 0
5 − 0
Ferroviária
 SP
1995
Details
XV de Piracicaba
 SP
2 − 0
1 − 0
Volta Redonda
 RJ
1996
Details
Vila Nova
 GO
2 − 1
1 − 0
Botafogo
 SP
1997
Details
Sampaio Corrêa
 MA
Juventus
 SP
From 1997 to 1999, the championship had no final match. The four best teams of the Fourth Round played against each other, and the team with most points were declared champions.
1998
Details
Avaí
 SC
São Caetano
 SP
1999
Details
Fluminense
 RJ
São Raimundo
 AM
2000 Not held
2001
Details
Etti Jundiaí
 SP(2)
Mogi Mirim
 SP
From 2001 on, the championship had no final match. The four best teams of the Fourth Round played against each other, and the team with most points were declared champions.
2002
Details
Brasiliense
 DF
Marília
 SP
2003
Details
Ituano
 SP
Santo André
 SP
2004
Details
União Barbarense
 SP
Gama
 DF
2005
Details
Remo
 PA
América
 RN
2006
Details
Criciúma
 SC
Vitória
 BA
From 2006 on, the championship had no final match. The eight best teams of the Fourth Round played against each other, and the team with most points were declared champions. Top 4 teams ascend to Série B
2007
Details
Bragantino
 SP
Bahia
 BA
2008
Details
Atlético Goianiense
 GO
Guarani
 SP
2009
Details
América
 MG
3 − 1
1 − 0
ASA
 AL
From 2009 on, the championship is divided in four groups of five clubs each, playing against each other twice within their groups. The two best-placed teams of each group qualify to the knockout stage, played in two legs. The final is played in two legs. The quarterfinal winners ascend to Série B.[2]
2010
Details
ABC
 RN
1 − 0
0 − 0
Ituiutaba
 MG
2011
Details
Joinville
 SC
3 − 1
4 − 0
CRB
 AL
2012
Details
Oeste
 SP
0 − 0
2 − 0
Icasa
 CE
2013
Details
Santa Cruz
 PE
0 − 0
2 − 1
Sampaio Corrêa
 MA
1 Associação Atlética Santo Amaro was later renamed Manchete.
2 Etti Jundiaí was later renamed Paulista.

Unofficial champions[edit]

The following season is not officially recognized by the CBF:[1][3]

Year Winner Score Runner-up Comments
2000
Details
Paraná (state)
Malutrom
1 − 1
3 − 2
Minas Gerais
Uberlândia
It was the Green and White modules of the Copa João Havelange.

Titles by team[edit]

Club State Titles
Atlético Goianiense  Goiás 2 titles
ABC  Rio Grande do Norte 1 title
América-MG  Minas Gerais 1 title
Avaí  Santa Catarina 1 title
Bragantino  São Paulo 1 title
Brasiliense  Distrito Federal 1 title
Criciúma  Santa Catarina 1 title
Etti Jundiaí (Paulista)  São Paulo 1 title
Fluminense  Rio de Janeiro 1 title
Ituano  São Paulo 1 title
Joinville  Santa Catarina 1 title
Novorizontino  São Paulo 1 title
Oeste  São Paulo 1 title
Olaria  Rio de Janeiro 1 title
Remo  Pará 1 title
Sampaio Corrêa  Maranhão 1 title
Santa Cruz  Pernambuco 1 title
Tuna Luso  Pará 1 title
União Barbarense  São Paulo 1 title
União São João  São Paulo 1 title
Vila Nova  Goiás 1 title
XV de Piracicaba  São Paulo 1 title

Titles by state[edit]

State Titles
 São Paulo 8 titles
 Goiás 3 titles
 Santa Catarina 3 titles
 Pará 2 titles
 Rio de Janeiro 2 titles
 Distrito Federal 1 title
 Maranhão 1 title
 Minas Gerais 1 title
 Pernambuco 1 title
 Rio Grande do Norte 1 title

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b (Portuguese) "Campeões" (in Portuguese). CBF. Retrieved October 29, 2009. [dead link]
  2. ^ http://www.cbf.com.br/seriec/tabela2009.html
  3. ^ Enciclopédia do Futebol Brasileiro Lance Volume 2. Rio de Janeiro: Aretê Editorial S/A. 2001. p. 387. ISBN 85-88651-01-7. 

External links[edit]