Canada (1891)

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This article is about the sailing vessel. For the WWI Royal Canadian Navy ship, see HMCS Canada. For the Royal Navy ships, see HMS Canada. For RMS Canada, see America class steamship.
Not to be confused with RMS Empress of Canada.
Career (Canada) Canadian Red Ensign 1868-1921.svg
Name: Canada
Owner: Charles Rufus Burgess, Wolfville, Nova Scotia
Port of registry: Windsor, Nova Scotia, Official Number 100262
Builder: C.R. Burgess Yard, Kingsport, Nova Scotia
Launched: 1891
Identification: Code Letters MHWF
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Fate: Broken Up, Portland Maine
General characteristics
Tonnage: 2301 Gross Tons
Length: 257 ft (78 m)
Beam: 45 ft (14 m)
Depth: 26' 6" ft.
Decks: 2
Propulsion: Sail
Sail plan: Full Rigged Ship

Canada was a full rigged ship built in 1891 at Kingsport, Nova Scotia on the Minas Basin. She was one of the largest wooden sailing vessels ever built in Canada. Her owner had planned to make her the largest sailing ship built in Canada but damage to a timber intended for the keel caused her length to be trimmed by ten feet making Canada slightly smaller than the ship William D. Lawrence.[2] Thousands of people from Kings and Hants Counties attended the launch. Classed A1 by Lloyd's Register for 14 years, Canada made several fast passages between South America and Australia. However by 1900, the ship was finding cargoes difficult to get in the face of competition from tramp steamers. Canada was converted to a gypsum barge in 1910, carrying gypsum from Windsor, Nova Scotia to Staten Island, New York for the Gypsum Transportation Company of New York. She was towed a final time from New York to Portland, Maine in 1926 where she was broken up.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lloyd's Register 1906
  2. ^ Joey St. Clair Patterson, Hantsport Shipbuilding: 1849-1893, Hantsport: Tug Boat Publishing, 2008, p. 111.

External links[edit]