Canada Party candidates, 1993 Canadian federal election

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The short-lived Canada Party fielded a number of candidates in the 1993 Canadian federal election, none of whom were elected. Information about these candidates may be found here.

Manitoba[edit]

Brandon—Souris: George H. Armstrong[edit]

Armstrong, a journalist, received 82 votes (0.22%) for an eighth place finish against Liberal candidate Glen McKinnon.[1]

Provencher: Ted Bezan[edit]

Ted Bezan is a former machine operator who described himself as retired in 1993.[2] He ran for the Social Credit Party of Canada twice in the 1960s and 1970s. He criticized the major parties' focus on deficit reduction in the 1993 federal election, and instead called for the Bank of Canada to issue interest-free loans to pay down the interest on Canada's national debt.[3]

In 1994, he argued that the Royal Canadian Legion's policy against headgear was not racist and should be left in place. Some Sikh groups had previously argued that the policy was exclusionary.[4] The following year, Bezan complained that recent translations of the Christian Bible were removing vital passages.[5] He has also called for the Bank of Canada to buy Canada's debt, or at least half of it, from its current owners.[6]

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
1963 federal Waterloo South Social Credit 372 4/4 Gordon Chaplin, Progressive Conservative
1974 federal Portage Social Credit 179 4/5 Peter Masniuk, Progressive Conservative
1993 federal Provencher Canada Party 69 0.19 7/7 David Iftody, Liberal

Portage—Lisgar: Hans C. Kjear[edit]

Kjear, a farmer, received 83 votes (0.23%) for an eighth place finish against Liberal candidate Jon Gerrard.[7]

Winnipeg South: Bill Martens[edit]

Martens is a lawyer. He received 44 votes (0.08%), finishing ninth against Liberal candidate Reg Alcock.

Winnipeg—Transcona: Bill Tataryn[edit]

Tataryn was a retired police officer.[8] He received 39 votes (0.09%), finishing ninth against New Democratic Party incumbent Bill Blaikie. The Winnipeg Free Press newspaper printed an obituary notice for a "William Tataryn" in 1998, although it is not clear if this was the same person.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Brandon—Souris, 1993, Parliament of Canada, accessed 18 December 2006.
  2. ^ History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Portage (1974/07/08), Parliament of Canada, accessed 9 August 2008; History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Provencher (1993/10/25), Parliament of Canada, accessed 9 August 2008. Please note that the vote totals listed on the 1993 page are incorrect.
  3. ^ Ted Bezan, "Interest-free" [letter], Winnipeg Free Press, 17 April 1993.
  4. ^ Ted Bezan, "Legion issue not about racism" [letter], Winnipeg Free Press, 7 June 1994.
  5. ^ Ted Bezan, "Bible field unguarded" [letter], Winnipeg Free Press, 14 September 1995, A7. See also Ted Bezan, "Creation cannot be measured in time" [letter], Winnipeg Free Press, 27 November 2000, A13.
  6. ^ Ted Bezan, "Time to take back national debt" [letter], Winnipeg Free Press, 15 November 2002, A17.
  7. ^ History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Portage—Lisgar, 1993, Parliament of Canada, accessed 4 August 1997. The parliamentary site lists Kjear as having received 84 votes; however, the official returns published by Elections Canada show him as having received 83. In 1997, the Winnipeg Free Press announced the death of a 73 year old farmer from Stonewall named Hans Nohr Kjear, who was apparently his father.
  8. ^ History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Winnipeg—Transcona, 1993, Parliament of Canada, accessed 13 March 2007.
  9. ^ Obituary notices, Winnipeg Free Press, 21 November 1998, A2.