Canada at the 2006 Winter Olympics

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Canada at the Olympic Games

Flag of Canada
IOC code  CAN
NOC Canadian Olympic Committee
Website www.olympic.ca (English) (French)
At the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin
Competitors 196 in 15 sports
Flag bearer Danielle Goyette (opening)[1]
Cindy Klassen (closing)[2]
Medals
Rank: 5
Gold
7
Silver
10
Bronze
7
Total
24
Olympic history (summary)
Summer Games
Winter Games
Intercalated Games
1906

Canada competed at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, with a team of 196 athletes and 220 support staff.

As host of the upcoming 2010 Winter Olympics, Canada was pressured to do well at the 2006 Games. The Canadian Olympic Committee's goal for 2006 was to have a top three finish in the medal count[3] or 25 total medals, as a start to reach their goal of having the highest medal count at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. Canada had managed to increase its medal count at each Winter Olympics since the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, United States. World Cup results from the 2005–06 season seemed to indicate that Canada would have a good performance in Turin, Italy. Canada met one of those goals and nearly met the other by finishing third behind the United States and Germany with 24 medals.[4] The Games were also the first litmus test for the increased athletic funding and resources pursued by the Own the Podium 2010 program.

Another task for the Canadian contingent was to promote the 2010 Games, Vancouver and surrounding region, the province of British Columbia, as well as Canada as a nation. This was evident in the Canadian participation in the closing ceremonies of the Games and the establishment of the Canada House in Turin. The Games also provided opportunities for organizing committees to gather experience and strategies to run the Games in Vancouver.

Medalists[edit]

Canada's total medal count of 24 was the highest ever won by the nation in any Winter Olympics, and was the second highest total for the country at any Olympic games (summer or winter), exceeded only by the 44 medals won at the 1984 Summer Olympics which were boycotted by the Soviet Union and other Eastern Bloc countries. Not only did Canada increase its total medal count from the previous Winter Games for the 7th straight time (since 1980), but the total medal count was also the "best ever" for Canada for the 5th straight time (since 1992).

Canada won at least one medal in 10 of the 15 sport disciplines competed at the games, and gold medals in 6 different disciplines; both feats were unmatched by any other nation. Canada also had the most 4th and 5th place finishes (14 and 9 respectively) of any country in these games. These results support the effectiveness of the Own the Podium 2010 program.

Cindy Klassen bested the total Olympic medals collected in a single Games by a Canadian, with 5, and bested the total Olympic medal count of any Canadian (Winter and Summer) with 6. The previous record of 3 medals at a single Olympics was held by Gaetan Boucher for the 1984 Winter Olympics and Marc Gagnon at the 2002 Winter Olympics. Meanwhile, Clara Hughes tied the old mark of 5 career Olympic medals, held by Marc Gagnon and Phil Edwards. Sixteen of the 24 medals were won by female athletes. At age 50, Russ Howard became the oldest Canadian gold medalist in Olympic history.

Alpine skiing pictogram.svg Alpine skiing[edit]

Men
Athlete Event Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Total Rank
Patrick Biggs Slalom 54.38 Did not finish
François Bourque Super-G n/a 1:31.27 8
Giant slalom 1:16.61 1:19.31 n/a 2:35.92 4
Combined 1:40.50 47.52 46.23 3:14.25 21
Thomas Grandi Giant slalom 1:17.23 1:19.65 n/a 2:36.88 10
Slalom 53.64 51.20 n/a 1:44.84 9
Erik Guay Super-G n/a 1:31.08 4
Michael Janyk Slalom 55.32 50.87 n/a 1:46.19 17
John Kucera Downhill n/a 1:51.55 27
Super-G n/a 1:32.10 22
Combined 1:41.04 46.67 45.55 3:13.26 17
Manuel Osborne-Paradis Downhill n/a 1:50.45 13
Super-G n/a 1:32.02 20
Combined 1:39.69 50.11 Did not start
Jean-Philippe Roy Giant slalom 1:17.36 Did not finish
Slalom Did not finish
Ryan Semple Giant slalom Did not finish
Combined 1:41.65 Did not finish
Women
Athlete Event Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Total Rank
Brigitte Acton Giant slalom 1:02.07 1:09.64 n/a 2:11.71 11
Slalom 44.75 47.15 n/a 1:31.90 17
Combined 40.18 44.59 1:30.98 2:55.75 10
Emily Brydon Downhill n/a 1:58.97 20
Super-G n/a 1:33.50 9
Combined 40.94 45.65 1:29.92 2:56.51 13
Sherry Lawrence Downhill n/a 2:00.47 27
Super-G n/a 1:35.47 34
Christina Lustenberger Giant slalom Did not finish
Shona Rubens Downhill n/a 2:00.30 26
Combined Did not finish
Genevieve Simard Super-G n/a 1:34.38 20
Giant slalom 1:01.47 1:09.26 n/a 2:10.73 5
Kelly Vanderbeek Downhill n/a 1:59.63 24
Super-G n/a 1:33.09 4

Note: In the men's combined, run 1 is the downhill, and runs 2 and 3 are the slalom. In the women's combined, run 1 and 2 are the slalom, and run 3 the downhill.

Biathlon pictogram.svg Biathlon[edit]

Athlete Event Final
Time Misses Rank
Martine Albert Women's sprint 27:04.4 2 73
Women's individual 59:52.1 5 65
Robin Clegg Men's sprint 29:12.4 3 51
Men's pursuit 40:30.33 7 44
Men's individual 59:21.5 2 36
Sandra Keith Women's sprint 26:20.7 3 66
Women's individual 55:56.3 2 42
Zina Kocher Women's sprint 26:11.1 4 62
Women's individual 54:18.8 3 27
Jean-Philippe Leguellec Men's sprint 29:32.3 2 60
Men's individual 1:00:28.0 3 48
David Leoni Men's sprint 28:50.4 1 42
Men's pursuit 41:07.41 6 47
Men's individual 1:02:37.8 6 65
Marie-Pierre Parent Women's sprint 27:31.1 2 76
Women's individual 1:02:57.1 4 77
Zina Kocher
Sandra Keith
Martine Albert
Marie-Pierre Parent
Women's relay 1:26:09.7 11 17

Bobsleigh pictogram.svg Bobsleigh[edit]

Athlete Event Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total Rank
Serge Despres
David Bissett
Two-man 56.13 55.92 56.69 56.93 3:45.67 11
Pierre Lueders
Lascelles Brown
Two-man 55.57 55.50 56.11 56.41 3:43.59 Silver medal icon.svg
Suzanne Gavine-Hlady
Jamie Cruickshank
Two-woman 58.49 57.86 58.65 58.82 3:53.82 13
Helen Upperton
Heather Moyse
Two-woman 57.37 57.77 58.09 57.83 3:51.06 4
Serge Despres
Nathan Cunningham
Steve Larsen
David Bissett
Four-man 56.10 56.15 55.69 55.58 3:43.52 18
Pierre Lueders
Ken Kotyk
Morgan Alexander
Lascelles Brown
Four-man 55.34 55.43 54.95 55.20 3:40.92 4

Cross country skiing pictogram.svg Cross-country skiing[edit]

Sean Crooks was suspended for 5 days by the International Ski Federation for having excessive hemoglobin levels. He was able to participate in the men's sprint and 4x10 km relay.

Distance
Athlete Event Final
Total Rank
Amanda Ammar Women's 10 km classical 31:51.7 54
Chandra Crawford Women's 15 km pursuit 50:35.4 60
Drew Goldsack Men's 15 km classical 42:09.3 53
Men's 30 km pursuit 1:24:14.3 56
George Grey Men's 15 km classical 40:43.9 31
Men's 30 km pursuit 1:19:08.9 25
Men's 50 km freestyle 2:09:38.4 44
Chris Jeffries Men's 30 km pursuit 1:26:17.0 61
Men's 50 km freestyle 2:13:49.5 58
Devon Kershaw Men's 15 km classical 41:42.7 47
Sara Renner Women's 10 km classical 28:33.0 8
Women's 15 km pursuit 44:30.9 16
Dan Roycroft Men's 15 km classical 42:39.7 58
Men's 30 km pursuit 1:20:53.3 39
Men's 50 km freestyle 2:13:47.5 57
Beckie Scott Women's 10 km classical Disqualified
Women's 15 km pursuit 43:20.6 6
Milaine Theriault Women's 10 km classical 31:30.4 46
Women's 15 km pursuit 48:38.9 54
Women's 30 km freestyle Did not start
Devon Kershaw
Sean Crooks
Chris Jeffries
George Grey
Men's 4 x 10 km relay 1:48:15.9 11
Milaine Theriault
Sara Renner
Amanda Ammar
Beckie Scott
Women's 4 x 5 km relay 56:49.8 10
Sprint
Athlete Event Qualifying Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank
Amanda Ammar Women's sprint 2:22.78 49 Did not advance 49
Chandra Crawford Women's sprint 2:51.06 8 Q 2:14.2 1 Q 2:13.4 1 Q 2:12.3 Gold medal icon.svg
Sean Crooks Men's sprint 2:20.70 32 Did not advance 32
Drew Goldsack Men's sprint 2:20.62 31 Did not advance 31
Devon Kershaw Men's sprint 2:21.49 37 Did not advance 37
Sara Renner Women's sprint 2:15.37 9 Q 2:15.6 4 Did not advance 16
Beckie Scott Women's sprint 2:12.45 1 Q 2:16.6 1 Q 2:15.8 2 Q 2:14.7 4
Phil Widmer Men's sprint 2:23.79 47 Did not advance 47
George Grey
Devon Kershaw
Men's team sprint n/a 17:31.2 6 Did not advance 11
Sara Renner
Beckie Scott
Women's team sprint n/a 17:19.3 2 Q 16:37.5 Silver medal icon.svg

Curling pictogram.svg Curling[edit]

Men's[edit]

Gold medal icon.svg: Brad Gushue, Mark Nichols, Russ Howard (skip), Jamie Korab, Mike Adam (alternate)

The Canadian foursome won the country's first Olympic medal in men's curling, and became the first Winter Olympic gold medal winners from the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Russ Howard was designated the skip by World Curling Federation rules, but Gushue threw last stones, and was considered to be the team leader.[5]

Gushue's rink finished first in the round-robin at the Canadian Olympic Curling Trials, then beat Jeff Stoughton in the final to secure the Olympic berth.

Round-robin
Draw 2
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Germany (Kapp) 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 x - 5
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 2 0 3 1 1 1 0 2 x - 10

;Draw 3

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 7
Sweden (Lindholm) 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 8

;Draw 4

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Gushue) 1 1 0 3 0 1 1 0 2 x - 9
Great Britain (Murdoch) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 x - 5

;Draw 5

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Gushue) 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 - 7
Switzerland (Stockli) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 - 5

;Draw 6

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Norway (Trulsen) 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 - 5
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 - 6

;Draw 8

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Finland (Uusipaavalniemi) 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 - 8
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 - 7

;Draw 9

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 6
Italy (Retornaz) 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 7

;Draw 11

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
New Zealand (Becker) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 x x x - 1
Canada (Gushue) 1 1 0 1 0 3 3 x x x - 9

;Draw 12

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 - 6
United States (Fenson) 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 - 3
Standings
Rank Team Skip Won Lost
1 Finland Markku Uusipaavalniemi 7 2
2 Canada Brad Gushue 6 3
3 United States Pete Fenson 6 3
4 Great Britain David Murdoch 6 3
5 Norway Pål Trulsen 5 4
6 Switzerland Ralph Stockli 5 4
7 Italy Joel Retornaz 4 5
8 Sweden Peter Lindholm 3 6
9 Germany Andy Kapp 3 6
10 New Zealand Sean Becker 0 9
Playoffs
Semifinal
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
United States (Fenson) 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 x - 5
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 5 x - 11

;Final

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Finland (Uusipavaalniemi) 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 x x - 5
Canada (Gushue) Hammer (Last Stone First End) Gold medal icon.svg 0 2 1 1 0 6 0 0 x x - 11

The Minister of Education for Newfoundland and Labrador canceled classes across the province in the afternoon to allow children to watch the game.[6]

Women's[edit]

Bronze medal icon.svg: Shannon Kleibrink (skip), Amy Nixon, Glenys Bakker, Christine Keshen, Sandra Jenkins (alternate)

Shannon Kleibrink's rink finished third in the round-robin at the Canadian Olympic Curling Trials, then won the semifinal over Stefanie Lawton and the final over Kelly Scott to secure the Olympic berth.

Round-robin
Draw 1
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Kleibrink) 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 0 - 5
Sweden (Norberg) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 - 7

;Draw 2

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
United States (Johnson) 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 x x - 5
Canada (Kleibrink) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 5 1 0 1 0 3 0 1 x x - 11

;Draw 3

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Kleibrink) 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 - 6
Russia (Privakova) 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 x - 5

;Draw 5

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Kleibrink) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 - 5
Switzerland (Ott) 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 1 - 6

;Draw 6

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Canada (Kleibrink) 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 3 2 0 - 10
Norway (Nordby)Hammer (Last Stone First End) 1 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 - 8

;Draw 7

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Great Britain (Martin) 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 x - 3
Canada (Kleibrink) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 4 x - 9

;Draw 8

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Japan (Onodera) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 - 5
Canada (Kleibrink) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 - 2

;Draw 10

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Italy (Gaspari) 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 x - 4
Canada (Kleibrink) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 1 2 2 0 2 0 0 2 2 x - 11

;Draw 12

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Denmark (Holm) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 - 8
Canada (Kleibrink) 0 3 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 1 - 9
Standings
Rank Team Skip Won Lost
1 Sweden Anette Norberg 7 2
2 Switzerland Mirjam Ott 7 2
3 Canada Shannon Kleibrink 6 3
4 Norway Dordi Nordby 6 3
5 Great Britain Rhona Martin 5 4
6 Russia Ludmila Privivkova 5 4
7 Japan Ayumi Onodera 4 5
8 Denmark Dorthe Holm 2 7
9 United States Cassandra Johnson 2 7
10 Italy Diana Gaspari 1 8
Playoffs
Semifinal
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Final
Switzerland (Ott) 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 - 7
Canada (Kleibrink) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 - 5

;Bronze final

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Final
Norway (Nordby) 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 X X 5
Canada (Kleibrink) Hammer (Last Stone First End) Bronze medal icon.svg 4 1 0 0 4 0 2 0 X X 11

Key: The hammer indicates which team had the last stone in the first end.

Figure skating pictogram.svg Figure skating[edit]

Athlete Event CD SP/OD FS/FD Total
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Jeffrey Buttle Men's n/a 73.29 6 Q 154.30 2 227.59 Bronze medal icon.svg
Mira Leung Ladies' n/a 50.61 14 Q 94.55 12 145.16 12
Joannie Rochette Ladies' n/a 55.85 9 Q 111.42 5 167.27 5
Emanuel Sandhu Men's n/a 69.75 7 Q 120.49 14 190.24 13
Shawn Sawyer Men's n/a 67.20 12 Q 123.63 12 190.24 12
Jessica Dubé
Bryce Davison
Pairs n/a 55.48 11 104.23 10 159.71 10
Marie-France Dubreuil
Patrice Lauzon
Ice dance 37.44 4 54.36 7 Withdrew
Valérie Marcoux
Craig Buntin
Pairs n/a 55.62 10 102.59 11 158.21 11
Megan Wing
Aaron Lowe
Ice dance 31.42 12 49.17 12 85.81 12 166.40 11

Key: CD = Compulsory Dance, FD = Free Dance, FS = Free Skate, OD = Original Dance, SP = Short Program

Freestyle skiing pictogram.svg Freestyle skiing[edit]

Jennifer Heil became the first Canadian woman to ever win gold in freestyle skiing after winning for women's moguls. At the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, she finished fourth and ended up a hundredth of a point off the podium.

Dale Begg-Smith, who won gold in men's moguls for Australia, was born in Canada and holds dual citizenship. He originally started skiing in Canada but found Canada's training program too restrictive. He moved to Australia to have more time to work on his business interests. Ironically, his win bumped Marc-André Moreau down to 4th place and off of the podium.

Men
Athlete Event Qualifying Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Jeff Bean Men's aerials 198.49 19 Did not advance 19
Alexandre Bilodeau Men's moguls 23.75 11 Q 23.42 11
Marc-André Moreau Men's moguls 24.69 3 Q 25.62 4
Kyle Nissen Men's aerials 231.64 7 Q 244.91 5
Steve Omischl Men's aerials 198.23 20 Did not advance 20
Warren Shouldice Men's aerials 243.45 3 Q 239.70 6
Chris Wong Men's moguls 23.89 9 Q 22.88 14
Women
Athlete Event Qualifying Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Veronika Bauer Women's aerials 176.66 5 Q 125.65 12
Deidra Dionne Women's aerials 128.30 22 Did not advance 22
Jennifer Heil Women's moguls 26.67 1 Q 26.50 Gold medal icon.svg
Amber Peterson Women's aerials 153.07 15 Did not advance 15
Kristi Richards Women's moguls 23.76 8 Q 23.30 7
Audrey Robichaud Women's moguls 22.73 12 Q 23.10 8
Stéphanie St-Pierre Women's moguls 22.15 17 Q 22.52 12

Ice hockey pictogram.svg Ice hockey[edit]

Hockey, like the previous two Olympics, attracted significant attention from Canadian fans. Many consider the Canadian men's team's performance in Turin as the most disappointing in years. In the last four games of the tournament, Canada failed to score in 11 of 12 periods, losing with the same score (2–0) against Switzerland, Finland, and in the quarterfinals against Russia. Hockey commentators, including Kelly Hrudey, commented that Canada did not play well as a team. The match against the Czech Republic was believed to be a better performance by the hockey team but the team lost to Russia two days after.

The quarterfinal game against Russia was watched on television screens across the nation in the afternoon Canadian time. The intensity of the game increased as the scoreless tie extended into the third period.

However, in the women's hockey discipline, Team Canada dominated the field with numerous wins leading up to their gold medal winning game.

Men's[edit]

Players
No. Pos.
Name
Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2005–06 team
30 G Brodeur, MartinMartin Brodeur 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 700195000000000000095 kg (209 lb) 6 May 1972 Montreal, QC New Jersey Devils (NHL)
1 G Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongo 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 700193000000000000093 kg (205 lb) 4 April 1979 Montreal, QC Florida Panthers (NHL)
35 G Turco, MartyMarty Turco 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 700183000000000000083 kg (183 lb) 13 August 1975 Sault Ste. Marie, ON Dallas Stars (NHL)
4 D Blake, RobRob BlakeA 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 7002102000000000000102 kg (225 lb) 10 December 1969 Simcoe, ON Colorado Avalanche (NHL)
3 D Bouwmeester, JayJay Bouwmeester 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 700188000000000000088 kg (194 lb) 27 September 1983 Edmonton, AB Florida Panthers (NHL)
52 D Foote, AdamAdam Foote 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 700198000000000000098 kg (216 lb) 10 July 1971 Toronto, ON Columbus Blue Jackets (NHL)
24 D McCabe, BryanBryan McCabe 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 7002100000000000000100 kg (220 lb) 8 June 1975 St. Catharines, ON Toronto Maple Leafs (NHL)
44 D Pronger, ChrisChris ProngerA 198 cm (6 ft 6 in) 7002100000000000000100 kg (220 lb) 10 October 1974 Dryden, ON Edmonton Oilers (NHL)
6 D Redden, WadeWade Redden 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 700195000000000000095 kg (209 lb) 12 June 1977 Lloydminster, SK Ottawa Senators (NHL)
28 D Regehr, RobynRobyn Regehr 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 7002102000000000000102 kg (225 lb) 19 April 1980 Recife, Brazil Calgary Flames (NHL)
14 F Bertuzzi, ToddTodd Bertuzzi 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 7002111000000000000111 kg (245 lb) 2 February 1975 Sudbury, ON Vancouver Canucks (NHL)
9 F Doan, ShaneShane Doan 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 700198000000000000098 kg (216 lb) 10 October 1976 Halkirk, AB Phoenix Coyotes (NHL)
33 F Draper, KrisKris Draper 187 cm (6 ft 2 in) 700186000000000000086 kg (190 lb) 24 May 1971 Toronto, ON Detroit Red Wings (NHL)
21 F Gagne, SimonSimon GagnéA 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 700184000000000000084 kg (185 lb) 29 February 1980 Sainte-Foy, QC Philadelphia Flyers (NHL)
15 F Heatley, DanyDany Heatley 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 700198000000000000098 kg (216 lb) 21 January 1981 Freiburg, West Germany Ottawa Senators (NHL)
12 F Iginla, JaromeJarome IginlaA 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 700195000000000000095 kg (209 lb) 1 July 1977 Edmonton, AB Calgary Flames (NHL)
40 F Lecavalier, VincentVincent Lecavalier 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 700193000000000000093 kg (205 lb) 21 April 1980 L'Île-Bizard, QC Tampa Bay Lightning (NHL)
61 F Nash, RickRick Nash 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 700193000000000000093 kg (205 lb) 16 June 1984 Brampton, ON Columbus Blue Jackets (NHL)
39 F Richards, BradBrad Richards 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 700190000000000000090 kg (200 lb) 2 May 1980 Murray Harbour, PE Tampa Bay Lightning (NHL)
91 F Sakic, JoeJoe SakicC 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 700188000000000000088 kg (194 lb) 7 July 1969 Burnaby, BC Colorado Avalanche (NHL)
94 F Smyth, RyanRyan Smyth 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 700186000000000000086 kg (190 lb) 21 February 1976 Banff, AB Edmonton Oilers (NHL)
26 F St. Louis, MartinMartin St. Louis 175 cm (5 ft 9 in) 700184000000000000084 kg (185 lb) 18 June 1975 Laval, QC Tampa Bay Lightning (NHL)
97 F Thornton, JoeJoe Thornton 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 7002102000000000000102 kg (225 lb) 2 July 1979 London, ON San Jose Sharks (NHL)

[7][8]

Defencement Scott Niedermayer and Ed Jovanovski were originally selected, but due to injuries were replaced by Jay Bouwmeester and Bryan McCabe, respectively.[9][7] Dan Boyle took McCabe's previous spot as a reserve.[7] Defenceman Dan Boyle and forwards Jason Spezza and Eric Staal were selected as "reserves" in case of injury before the tournament began.[7]

Results
Round-robin
15 February 2006 v
13:05
 Italy 2 – 7
(0–1, 2–5, 0–1)
 Canada Palasport Olimpico
Attendance: 8,575
16 February 2006 v
20:05
 Canada 5 – 1
(3–0, 1–1, 1–0)
 Germany Palasport Olimpico
Attendance: 8,554
18 February 2006 v
15:35
 Canada 0 – 2
(0–1, 0–1, 0–0)
  Switzerland Torino Esposizioni
Attendance: 4,769
19 February 2006 v
21:05
 Finland 2 – 0
(2–0, 0–0, 0–0)
 Canada Torino Esposizioni
Attendance: 4,420
21 February 2006 v
12:35
 Canada 3 – 2
(3–0, 0–1, 0–1)
 Czech Republic Palasport Olimpico
Attendance: 9,126
Standings
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS
 Finland 5 5 0 0 19 2 10
  Switzerland 5 2 1 2 10 12 6
 Canada 5 3 2 0 15 9 6
 Czech Republic 5 2 3 0 14 12 4
 Germany 5 0 3 2 7 16 2
 Italy 5 0 3 2 9 23 2
Medal round
Quarterfinal
22 February 2006
20:35
 Russia 2 – 0
(0-0, 0-0, 2-0)
 Canada Torino Esposizioni
Attendance: 4130

Women's[edit]

Players
No Player G A Pts PIM
7 Cherie Piper 4 8 12 0
22 Hayley Wickenheiser 4 8 12 2
10 Gillian Apps 5 4 9 8
13 Caroline Ouellette 3 4 7 0
16 Jayna Hefford 2 3 5 0
26 Sarah Vaillancourt 2 3 5 2
17 Jennifer Botterill 1 4 5 2
15 Danielle Goyette 4 1 5 4
77 Cassie Campbell 0 5 5 0
3 Carla MacLeod 2 2 4 2
8 Katie Weatherston 3 1 4 2
2 Meghan Agosta 3 1 4 2
11 Cheryl Pounder 2 1 3 2
61 Vicky Sunohara 1 1 2 2
27 Gina Kingsbury 0 2 2 2
4 Becky Kellar 0 1 1 2
9 Gillian Ferrari 0 0 0 0
5 Colleen Sostorics 0 0 0 4
No Goaltender Mins GA GAA Sv%
32 Charline Labonté 60 0 0.00 1.000
33 Kim St-Pierre 120 1 0.50 .923
Results
Round-robin
11 February 2006 v
20:35
Canada  16 – 0
(5–0, 4–0, 7–0)
 Italy Palasport Olimpico
Attendance: 8,399
12 February 2006 v
16:35
Russia  0 – 12
(0–7, 0–2, 0–3)
 Canada Torino Esposizioni
Attendance: 2,414
14 February 2006 v
15:35
Canada  8 – 1
(2–0, 5–1, 1–0)
 Sweden Palasport Olimpico
Attendance: 6,850
Standings
Team GP W L T GF GA PTS
 Canada 3 3 0 0 36 1 6
 Sweden 3 2 1 0 15 9 4
 Russia 3 1 2 0 6 16 2
 Italy 3 0 3 0 1 32 0
Medal round
Semifinal
17 February 2006 v
21:05
Canada  6 – 0
(2–0, 2–0, 2–0)
 Finland Palasport Olimpico
Attendance: 5,654
Final
20 February 2006 v
20:35
Silver medal icon.svg Sweden  1 – 4
(0–2, 0–2, 1–0)
 Canada Gold medal icon.svg Palasport Olimpico
Attendance: 6,664

Luge pictogram.svg Luge[edit]

Athlete Event Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total Rank
Jeff Christie Men's singles 52.382 52.027 52.013 51.939 3:28.361 14
Ian Cockerline Men's singles 52.290 52.107 52.255 Did not finish
Samuel Edney Men's singles 52.663 52.523 52.360 52.311 3:29.857 19
Alex Gough Women's singles 48.286 49.902 47.922 48.045 3:14.155 20
Regan Lauscher Women's singles 47.584 47.418 47.320 47.321 3:09.643 10
Meaghan Simister Women's singles 48.185 48.682 Did not finish
Grant Albrecht
Eric Pothier
Doubles 47.478 48.083 n/a 1:35.561 10
Chris Moffat
Mike Moffat
Doubles 47.715 47.826 n/a 1:35.541 9

Nordic combined pictogram.svg Nordic combined[edit]

Athlete Event Ski jumping Cross-country
Points Rank Deficit Time Rank
Jason Myslicki Sprint 90.0 43 2:23 21:23.1
+2:54.1
41
Individual Gundersen 207.5 32 3:40 46:21.0
+6:36.4
41
Max Thompson Sprint 84.5 45 2:45 22:09.3
+3:40.3
46
Individual Gundersen 171.5 46 6:04 47:57.8
+8:13.2
44

Note: 'Deficit' refers to the amount of time behind the leader a competitor began the cross-country portion of the event. Italicized numbers show the final deficit from the winner's finishing time.

Short track speed skating pictogram.svg Short track speed skating[edit]

Men
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Éric Bédard 500 m 42.480 1 Q 42.267 1 Q 41.950 2 Q 42.093 4
1000 m 1:28.274 1 Q 1:27.546 2 Q Disqualified
Charles Hamelin 1500 m 2:19.469 1 Q n/a 2:20.854 1 Q 2:26.375 4
François-Louis Tremblay 500 m 42.779 2 Q 42.110 2 Q 42.261 1 Q 42.002 Silver medal icon.svg
1000 m 1:28.925 1 Q Disqualified
Mathieu Turcotte 1500 m 2:23.402 1 Q n/a 2:18.280 3 Final B
2:24.558
6
Éric Bédard
Jonathan Guilmette
Charles Hamelin
François-Louis Tremblay
Mathieu Turcotte
5000 m relay n/a 6:57.004 1 6:43.707 Silver medal icon.svg
Women
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Alanna Kraus 500 m 45.688 1 Q 45.172 3 Did not advance 9
Anouk Leblanc-Boucher 500 m 45.929 1 Q 44.821 2 Q 45.234 2 Q 44.759 Bronze medal icon.svg
1500 m 2:28.001 4 Did not advance 16
Amanda Overland 1000 m 1:33.761 1 Q 1:33.012 2 Q 1:33.102 3 Final B
1:34.191
5
1500 m 2:27.666 2 Q n/a 2:22.946 2 Q 2:26.495 5
Kalyna Roberge 500 m 45.396 1 Q 45.710 2 Q 44.960 3 Final B
46.605
4
Tania Vicent 1000 m 1:33.904 1 Q 1:35.594 3 ADV 1:32.650 3 Final B
1:34.099
4
Alanna Kraus
Anouk Leblanc-Boucher
Amanda Overland
Kalyna Roberge
Tania Vicent
3000 m relay n/a 4:17.231 2 Q 4:17.336 Silver medal icon.svg

Key: 'ADV' indicates a skater was advanced due to being interfered with.

Skeleton pictogram.svg Skeleton[edit]

Mellisa Hollingsworth-Richards won a bronze medal in Skeleton, thus becoming the first Canadian to win an Olympic medal in the event. A day later, Duff Gibson became the first Canadian to win a gold medal in the event after taking the men's gold. Fellow Canadian Jeff Pain won the silver medal, and there were chances of a bronze as well; however, their teammate placed fourth.

Gibson, 39, became the oldest competitor to win an individual gold medal in Winter Olympics history, surpassing Al MacInnis as the oldest Canadian to win a gold medal. MacInnis won gold at the 2002 Winter Olympics on the Canadian men's hockey team.

Athlete Event Final
Run 1 Run 2 Total Rank
Lindsay Alcock Women's 1:01.26 1:01.59 2:02.85 10
Paul Boehm Men's 58.61 58.45 1:57.06 4
Duff Gibson Men's 57.80 58.08 1:55.88 Gold medal icon.svg
Mellisa Hollingsworth-Richards Women's 1:00.39 1:01.02 2:01.41 Bronze medal icon.svg
Jeff Pain Men's 57.98 58.16 1:56.14 Silver medal icon.svg

Ski jumping pictogram.svg Ski jumping[edit]

Athlete Event Qualifying First round Final
Points Rank Points Rank Points Total Rank
Gregory Baxter Normal hill 100.0 41 Did not advance 41
Large hill 58.5 24 Did not advance 41
Graeme Gorham Normal hill 97.5 42 Did not advance 42
Large hill 69.4 35 Q 61.1 50 Did not advance 50
Michael Nell Normal hill 83.5 50 Did not advance 50
Large hill 48.0 49 Did not advance 49
Stefan Read Normal hill 114.5 21 Q 105.0 42 Did not advance 42
Large hill 88.5 19 Q 98.8 26 Q 89.4 188.2 30
Gregory Baxter
Graeme Gorham
Michael Nell
Stefan Read
Team 276.8 15 Did not advance 15

Note: PQ indicates a skier was pre-qualified for the final, based on entry rankings.

Snowboarding pictogram.svg Snowboarding[edit]

Maëlle Ricker and Dominique Vallee competed in two of the Snowboarding disciplines, halfpipe and snowboard cross, while Jasey-Jay Anderson competed in snowboard cross and parallel giant slalom.

Halfpipe
Athlete Event Qualifying run 1 Qualifying run 2 Final
Points Rank Points Rank Run 1 Run 2 Rank
Sarah Conrad Women's halfpipe 19.4 20 33.5 9 Did not advance 15
Justin Lamoureux Men's halfpipe 10.1 41 31.5 15 Did not advance 21
Crispin Lipscomb Men's halfpipe 19.6 30 37.9 6 Q (23.4) 33.5 11
Brad Martin Men's halfpipe 27.2 21 34.7 10 Did not advance 16
Hugo Lemay Men's halfpipe 26.0 24 34.1 12 Did not advance 18
Mercedes Nicoll Women's halfpipe 33.0 9 17.5 21 Did not advance 27
Maëlle Ricker Women's halfpipe 25.9 16 23.2 23 Did not advance 29
Dominique Vallee Women's halfpipe 31.5 12 24.5 15 Did not advance 21

Note: In the final, the single best score from two runs is used to determine the ranking. A bracketed score indicates a run that wasn't counted.

Parallel GS
Athlete Event Qualification Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Time Rank Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Rank
Jasey-Jay Anderson Men's parallel giant slalom 1:12.75 20 Did not advance 20
Philippe Berubé Men's parallel giant slalom 1:30.03 29 Did not advance 29
Alexa Loo Women's parallel giant slalom 1:23.51 20 Did not advance 20

Key: '+ Time' represents a deficit; the brackets indicate the results of each run.

Snowboard cross
Athlete Event Qualifying 1/8 finals Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Jasey-Jay Anderson Men's snowboard cross 1:22.27 20 Q 1 Q 1 Q 4 Small final
1
5
Francois Boivin Men's snowboard cross 1:23.17 30 Q 2 Q 3 Did not advance Classification 9–12
2
10
Dominique Maltais Women's snowboard cross 1:29.33 2 Q n/a 1 Q 2 Q 3 Bronze medal icon.svg
Drew Neilson Men's snowboard cross 1:19:93 1 Q 3 Did not advance 17
Maëlle Ricker Women's snowboard cross 1:27.85 1 Q n/a 1 Q 1 Q 4 4
Erin Simmons Women's snowboard cross 1:32.74 17 Did not advance 17
Dominique Vallee Women's snowboard cross 1:33.57 19 Did not advance 19
Tom Velisek Men's snowboard cross 1:22.12 18 Q 3 Did not advance 23

Speed skating pictogram.svg Speed skating[edit]

Canada became the first country to set a new record at the 2006 Winter Olympics when both its men's and women's teams set an Olympic record in the qualifying round of the team pursuit.

Cindy Klassen set or tied several medal records. She became the first Canadian to win five medals in one Olympics, winning a gold (1500 m), two silver medals (team pursuit, 1000 m) and two bronze medals (3000 m, 5000 m). Her bronze medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics gives her a total of six medals and the title of the most decorated Canadian Olympian, winter or summer. Tied at five medals for Canada are short track speed skater Marc Gagnon, track athlete Dr. Phil Edwards, and speed skater Clara Hughes, who won her fourth and fifth medal at the 2006 Olympics. In addition to the Canadian medal records, Klassen also tied Eric Heiden to win the most medals by a speed skater at a single Olympics.

Men
Athlete Event Race 1 Final
Time Rank Time Rank
Arne Dankers 1500 m n/a 1:48.42 17
5000 m n/a 6:21.26 5
10000 m n/a 13:23.55 9
Steven Elm 1000 m n/a 1:11.36 29
1500 m n/a 1:48.09 12
5000 m n/a 6:41.53 22
Michael Ireland 500 m 35.59 35.29 1:10.88 7
Vincent Labrie 500 m 36.31 36.12 1:12.43 29
Brock Miron 500 m 36.42 36.12 1:12.54 30
Denny Morrison 1000 m n/a 1:10.44 19
1500 m n/a 1:48.04 11
Francois Olivier Roberge 1000 m n/a 1:10.20 16
Justin Warsylewicz 1500 m n/a 1:49.77 27
5000 m n/a 6:43.74 24
Jeremy Wotherspoon 500 m 35.37 35.68 1:11.05 9
1000 m n/a 1:09.76 11
Women
Athlete Event Race 1 Final
Time Rank Time Rank
Kristina Groves 1000 m n/a 1:16.54 5
1500 m n/a 1:56.74 Silver medal icon.svg
3000 m n/a 4:09.03 8
5000 m n/a 7:03.95 6
Clara Hughes 3000 m n/a 4:09.17 9
5000 m n/a 6:59.07 Gold medal icon.svg
Cindy Klassen 1000 m n/a 1:16.09 Silver medal icon.svg
1500 m n/a 1:55.27 Gold medal icon.svg
3000 m n/a 4:04.37 Bronze medal icon.svg
5000 m n/a 7:00.57 Bronze medal icon.svg
Krisy Myers 500 m 39.83 39.60 1:19.43 22
Christine Nesbitt 1000 m n/a 1:17.54 14
1500 m n/a 1:59.15 7
Shannon Rempel 500 m 39.42 39.43 1:18.85 16
1000 m n/a 1:18.35 24
1500 m n/a 2:02.24 28
Kerry Simpson 500 m 39.69 39.65 1:19.34 21
Kim Weger 500 m 40.01 39.98 1:19.99 26
Team pursuit
Athlete Event Seeding Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Rank
From:
Arne Dankers
Steven Elm
Denny Morrison
Jason Parker
Justin Warsylewicz
Men's team pursuit 3:47.37 1 OR Japan (8)
W 3:52.01
Norway (4)
W 3:44.91
Italy (2)
L 3:47.28
Silver medal icon.svg
From:
Kristina Groves
Clara Hughes
Cindy Klassen
Christine Nesbitt
Shannon Rempel
Women's team pursuit 3:06.45 3 United States (6)
W 3:01.24
Japan (7)
W 3:02.13
Germany (2)
L 3:02.91
Silver medal icon.svg

Flag bearer[edit]

Women's ice hockey player Danielle Goyette carried the flag for Canada in the opening ceremony. Cross-country skier Beckie Scott, bobsledder Pierre Lueders, long-track speedskaters Cindy Klassen and Clara Hughes all said that they would not submit their names to carry the flag.

Scott, Klassen and Hughes all had events within two days of the opening ceremonies and believed that not participating in the opening ceremonies would give them a better chance at a finishing well in their events. Lueders turned down the chance because at the time it appeared that his bobsleigh partner, Lascelles Brown, would not be granted Canadian citizenship. Afterwards, Lueders said he would carry the flag but said that Brown would be a much better choice.

Some criticized these choices, including hockey analyst Don Cherry, who called the athletes unpatriotic and said that other athletes would have loved to have had the opportunity. Others, including past flag bearer Catriona LeMay Doan spoke in favour of their decisions, saying that the opening ceremonies were a long process and took a lot of energy. She criticized Don Cherry, saying that many athletes in the past had turned down the flag-bearing opportunity at the opening ceremonies in order to focus on their competition, and that Don Cherry, having never participated in international athletic competition, does not have the right to be critical of Olympic athletes.

After winning five medals (more than any other Canadian at a Winter Games), Cindy Klassen accepted the selection as the flag bearer for the closing ceremonies.

Other participation[edit]

As the host nation of the next Winter Games, Canada's role was to promote the 2010 Winter Olympics, its host city, its host province, and the country over the duration of these Games. Canada House was a log cabin constructed with Canadian pine wood and it was one of 12 nation's houses established in Turin. The pavilion opened its doors to the public on January 23, 2006, at piazza Valdo Fusi, in the city centre and would remain open until March 20 at the conclusion of the Paralympic Winter Games. Aside from showcasing Canadian culture, the building would host meetings for companies from British Columbia and Italy who would be interested to develop business partnerships. The building would be donated to the city of Turin and would be transferred to a new city park after the Games.

During the closing ceremonies of these Games, there was a brief segment in which Canada delivered a preview of the 2010 Games. This included a choreographed program featuring Avril Lavigne, raising of the Canadian flag, and singing of O Canada by opera star Ben Heppner, himself a B.C. native. The handover of the Games was highlighted by Vancouver mayor Sam Sullivan, a quadriplegic, accepting and waving the Olympic flag. Aside from the flag handed from the mayor of Turin Sergio Chiamparino, the City of Vancouver is now the custodian of the actual Olympic flag lowered at Stadio Olimpico during the closing ceremonies.

British Columbia Premier Gordon Campbell, himself a Vancouver native, and Governor General Michaëlle Jean attended the Games' competitions and closing ceremonies. They also availed themselves to the news media, sharing their thoughts about British Columbia and Canada welcoming the world in 2010. The federal government was represented by the attendance of Foreign Affairs Minister Peter MacKay at the closing ceremonies.

A number of Canadian citizens with dual citizenship have competed for other countries and served as their respective flag bearers:

In Ottawa, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said in a statement that the Olympic flame had begun the journey to Vancouver.[10]

Notes[edit]

  • 2006 was the first year since 1988 that Canada had athletes competing in Nordic combined and the first since 1992 that Canada had athletes in ski jumping.
  • While skiing in the final of the women's team sprint in cross-country skiing, Sara Renner broke her ski pole. Fortunately, a coach immediately handed her a new pole. It was later revealed that the coach was not from Canada, but from Norway. Sara Renner and her partner Beckie Scott went on to win a silver medal in the event. Ironically, the Norwegian team finished fourth, so people conclude that if not for the coach then perhaps it would have been Norway that won a medal and not Canada.
  • Lascelles Brown, who previously competed for Jamaica, competed for Canada in bobsleigh. He would go on to win a silver medal in two-man bobsleigh with partner Pierre Lueders.

Official outfitter[edit]

HBC became the official outfitter of clothing for members of the Canadian Olympic team and replacing Roots Canada. The same clothing was also sold at HBC stores in Canada. HBC had been the official outfitters for Canada's Winter teams in 1936, 1960, 1964 and 1968.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Flagbearers for the Opening Ceremony". Archived from the original on 2012-02-09. Retrieved February 22, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Flagbearers for the Closing Ceremony". Archived from the original on 2012-02-09. Retrieved February 22, 2009. 
  3. ^ "COC aims high at 2010 Vancouver Games". CBC News. January 21, 2005. 
  4. ^ FIS-Ski[dead link]
  5. ^ "Canadian curling teams differ on ice conditions". CTV.ca. Retrieved February 22, 2009. [dead link]
  6. ^ "The Rock is Rockin'". The Sports Network. Retrieved February 22, 2009. 
  7. ^ a b c d "2006 Winter Olympics (Men's Roster)". Hockey Canada. 
  8. ^ "Rob Blake, Simon Gagné, Jarome Iginla and Chris Pronger named alternate captains with Canada's men's Olympic hockey team". Turin, Italy: Hockey Canada. 15 February 2006. 
  9. ^ The Associated Press (30 January 2006). "Team Canada defenseman Ed Jovanovski will miss Olympics". Vancouver, BC. 
  10. ^ "The Prime Minister congratulates our athletes and coaches on their performance in Turin". Prime Minister of Canada. 2006-02-26. Retrieved 2014-02-24. 

External links[edit]