Canadian Electric Vehicles

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Canadian Electric Vehicles
Véhicules électriques canadiens
Type Canadian Privately owned
Industry Automotive
Founded 1996
Headquarters Errington, British Columbia, Canada
Key people Randy Holmquist President
Products Automobiles
Engines
Revenue $2 million (2013)
Employees 6
Website http://www.canev.com/

Canadian Electric Vehicles Ltd. was first established in 1996 in Errington, British Columbia. During the initial years, its focus was to provide designs, parts and technical support for converting conventional internal combustion vehicles to non-polluting battery powered electric vehicles. Once converted, these vehicles were acquired by a variety of purchasers including federal and provincial governments, industrial companies as well as private individuals. The conversions ranged from three wheeled utility vehicles to house boats as well as various full-sized cars and trucks.

History[edit]

Canadian Electric Vehicles (CEV) has been designing and manufacturing electric vehicles and electric vehicle components for over 20 years. With world-wide sales CEV is a successful global business. Vehicles in service range in size from three ton aircraft refueling and LAV trucks to the Might-E Tug, an electric towing unit which tows a variety of carts and equipment weighing up to 10,000 pounds. The primary CEV product is the Might-E Truck, a custom heavy duty electric utility vehicle. Might-E Trucks are in operation at Universities, Government Sites, Industries, Parks, Municipalities and private companies.

Canadian Electric Vehicles was established in 1995. During the initial years the focus of Canadian Electric Vehicles was to provide the designs, parts and technical support for converting conventional internal combustion vehicles to non-polluting battery powered electric vehicles. Once converted these vehicles were purchased by federal and provincial governments, industrial companies as well as private individuals. The conversions ranged from three wheeled utility vehicles to a 22’ house boat as well as full-sized cars and trucks.

In 2000 Canadian Electric Vehicles was approached by Los Angeles airport to design and build an electric powered aircraft refueling truck. Over 70 of these three ton trucks have been converted and are in use at airports in North America, Europe, Middle East and Australia. Randy Holmquist, with his staff of technicians and engineers continues to offer contract research and development services for the design and prototyping of electric vehicles for various industrial applications.

Products and Services[edit]

Canadian Electric Vehicles is best known for their road legal, versatile and fully electric Might-E Truck, which they have been producing for over 15 years. The truck features attributes such as regenerative brakes, power steering, hydraulic lifts, and direct motor to differential drive trains to allow for controlled handling and comfort as well as increased range and durability.

The Might-E Tug is another fully electric product developed and manufactured by Canadian Electric Vehicles. This three-wheeled tug employs a direct motor to differential drive train powered by a 24-volt, 70-amp four quadrant controller. It is designed to alleviate the user from pulling heavy loads by being able to pull weights up to 2000 lbs.[1]

Industrial Projects:

• Electric Touring Carriage Drive System for New York’s Central Park • Portable Industrial Air Compressors • Three-Wheeled Electric Police Patrol Vehicles • On-site 5 Ton Dump Truck Drive System for use in New Zealand’s Forestry Industry • Rubber-Tracked Platform for use in Construction Projects in Japan • Electric Bobcat for Commercial Greenhouses • Prototype Consulting for Various Mining Vehicles

Since its inception, Canadian Electric Vehicles has been designing and producing conversion "kits" for the mechanically inclined hobbyist. These kits come in a variety of vehicles ranging from the Ford Ranger to a Volkswagen Beetle.

References[edit]

External Links[edit]

Canadian Electric Vehicles Website Might-E Truck Webpage Might-E Tug Webpage