Canajoharie, New York

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For the village located within this town, see Canajoharie (village), New York.
Canajoharie
Town
Canajoharie is located in New York
Canajoharie
Canajoharie
Location of Canajoharie in New York
Coordinates: 42°54′22″N 74°34′19″W / 42.90611°N 74.57194°W / 42.90611; -74.57194Coordinates: 42°54′22″N 74°34′19″W / 42.90611°N 74.57194°W / 42.90611; -74.57194
Country United States
State New York
County Montgomery
Government
 • Type Town Council
 • Town Supervisor Herbert T. Allen (R)
 • Town Council
Area
 • Total 43.1 sq mi (111.7 km2)
 • Land 42.6 sq mi (110.4 km2)
 • Water 0.5 sq mi (1.3 km2)
Population (2010)[1]
 • Total 3,730
 • Density 86/sq mi (33/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)

Canajoharie /ˌkænəˈhæri/ is a town in Montgomery County, New York, United States. The population was 3,730 at the 2010 census.[1] Canajoharie is located south of the Mohawk River on the south border of the county. The Erie Canal passes along the north town line. There is a village of Canajoharie in the town. Both are east of Utica and west of Amsterdam.

History[edit]

The town is near the former site of Canajoharie, an important village of the Mohawk nation that became known as the Upper Castle. The Mohawk had as their territory most of the central area of present-day New York from the Hudson River west to where Oneida territory started. They also used the St. Lawrence River valley as hunting grounds after 1600. They dominated the fur trade with the French in central Quebec, and Dutch and English in eastern New York after the Seven Years' War. French, Dutch and later English trappers and traders came to this village to trade with the Mohawk. Both the French and Dutch married Mohawk women, increasing their ties with the people. Many of their sons also became trappers or traders.

Anglo-Europeans began settling in the area around 1730. Because the Mohawk and three other Iroquois nations were allied with the British during the Revolutionary War, they were forced to cede most of their lands in New York after the United States victory. The state sold millions of acres of land to speculators and private owners.

The modern Town was formed in 1788, but was reduced to form the towns of Minden (1798) and Root (in part, 1823). While the Mohawk Valley developed with the completion of the Erie Canal, the project also enabled considerable migration to the Midwest. The population of the town in 1865 was 4,248.

Beech-Nut, the baby food producer, was founded in Canajoharie in 1891 during the period of early industrialization in the valley. It served as the largest employer in the Town for more than a century. The Beech-Nut factory moved out of Canajoharie in March 2011 and relocated to a new factory in the nearby Town of Florida, near Amsterdam.[2]

Notable residents[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 43.1 square miles (111.7 km2), of which 42.6 square miles (110.4 km2) is land and 0.50 square miles (1.3 km2), or 1.16%, is water.[1]

The south town line is the border of Schoharie County, and the north town line is defined by the Mohawk River.

The New York State Thruway crosses the northern part of the town, following the river. New York State Route 5S parallels the Thruway. New York State Route 10 is a north-south highway, intersecting the Thruway and NY-5S at Canajoharie village.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 3,797 people, 1,492 households, and 1,026 families residing in the town. The population density was 88.5 people per square mile (34.2/km²). There were 1,637 housing units at an average density of 38.2 per square mile (14.7/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.02% White, 0.63% Black or African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.32% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.13% of the population.

There were 1,492 households out of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.0% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 26.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the town the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 23.7% from 45 to 64, and 16.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $31,701, and the median income for a family was $39,646. Males had a median income of $29,107 versus $22,617 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,702. About 11.0% of families and 11.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.8% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.

Communities and locations in the town[edit]

  • Ames – A village in the south part of the town on NY-10.
  • Bowmans Creek – A stream in the south part of the town.
  • Budd Hill – A location at the south town line, south of Ames.
  • Buel – A hamlet in the southwest part of the town on Bowmans Creek. The community and much of the south part of Canajoharie were once called Bowmans Creek after early settler Jacob Bowman.
  • Canajoharie – A village in the north part of the town on the Mohawk River and NY-10.
  • Canajoharie Creek – A stream in the south central part of the town.
  • Fort Plain – A village that is partly in the town at the western town line.
  • Maple Hill – A location east of Marshville.
  • Mapletown – A location near the east town line, named after local trees.
  • Marshville – A hamlet south of Canajoharie village on NY-10.
  • Sprout Brook – A hamlet in the southwest part of the town on Bowmans Creek.
  • Van Deusenville – A hamlet near the town line in the southwest part of the town.
  • Waterville – A hamlet northeast of Ames.

References in popular culture[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Canajoharie town, Montgomery County, New York". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved November 15, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Beech-Nut ends production in Canjoharie," The Leader-Herald, 27 March 2011
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]