Canary Lee Burton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Canary Lee Burton (born 16 September 1942) is an American keyboardist, composer and writer. Burton was born in Richmond, California and later lived in El Paso, Texas. She studied music at the University of Idaho at Moscow, Idaho, from 1972-1979,[1] and relocated to Washington D.C. and then to Cape Cod. Burton continued her studies with Kevin Toney in jazz in 1980, with David Sussman in 1988, with John Zielinski in composition from 1990 to 1992, and briefly with Rodney Lister at the New England Conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1995. She worked as a music teacher from 1996-2000.

Burton founded and played in various rock and jazz ensembles while completing her education and worked at WPFW Pacifica radio in Washington D.C. for three years. After moving to Cape Cod, she established her own contemporary music radio show The Latest Score, on WOMR in Provincetown, Massachusetts.[2] Selected pieces of her work were included in the published collection Music of Living Composers, compiled by the Campbell University piano professor and composer Betty Wishart in 1997. Her works have been performed internationally.

Selected Works

  • Familiarity (1977), lead sheet, jazz, one instrument[3]
  • Meteor Shower (1977), jazz/instrumental
  • Sometime After One (1982), for piano
  • Gaia (1987), for piano
  • Costa Brava (1989), for piano
  • Atlantic Sonata (1992), for piano
  • The Promise (1993), for voice and piano
  • Companion (2006), for jazz piano[4]
  • The Broken Record (2008), for piano[5]
  • Daniella’s Hope (2008), for piano four-hands[6]
  • Whispers (2011), for guitar[7]
  • String Theory (2011), for string orchestra[8]
  • Chopin Slept (2011), for piano trio[9]

Burton's music has been recorded and issued on CD, including:

  • Piano Music from Cape Cod, Audio CD, January 18, 2005, Seabird Studio[10]
  • Women in Harmony, Audio CD, Tempus Floridum, 2010[11]

References

  1. ^ Anne Gray, The World of Women in Classical Music (La Jolla CA: WordWorld, 2007).
  2. ^ Broadcast schedule at http://www.womr.org/dj_burton.html.
  3. ^ Burton's works from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s are listed at http://www.musicaneo.com/sheetmusic/43856_canary_burton/.
  4. ^ Listed in Pan Pipes: Sigma Alpha Iota Quarterly, 99 (2006). Premiered by Daniella Baas, November 2007; see http://www.sai-national.org/home/ComposersBureau/BurtonCanaryL/tabid/280/Default.aspx.
  5. ^ Premiered by Max Lifchitz, October 2008; see http://newswire.scena.org/2008/10/composers-young-and-younger.html.
  6. ^ See http://www.sai-national.org/home/ComposersBureau/BurtonCanaryL/tabid/280/Default.aspx.
  7. ^ Information at Aaron Larget-Caplan webpage http://www.aaronlc.com/newlullaby/. Concert poster at http://www.seabirdstudio.com/Poster2.html.
  8. ^ See http://www.sai-national.org/home/ComposersBureau/BurtonCanaryL/tabid/280/Default.aspx.
  9. ^ Commissioned by Daniella Baas. Premiered by Elisabeth Deletaille, violin, Bruno Ispiola, cello, and André Grignard, piano. See http://www.sai-national.org/home/ComposersBureau/BurtonCanaryL/tabid/280/Default.aspx.
  10. ^ See http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/canaryburton
  11. ^ See http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/tempusfloridum.

Further reading

  • Burns, Kristine Helen. Women and Music in America Since 1900: An Encyclopedia. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 2002, I: 312.
  • Fanfare Magazine, March/April 2012: 272.
  • Pan Pipes: Sigma Alpha Iota Quarterly, 94–95 (2002): 24-25.

External links