Canaveral National Seashore

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Canaveral National Seashore
IUCN category V (protected landscape/seascape)
CanaveralNationalSeashore1.jpg
A SSE view down the shore
Map showing the location of Canaveral National Seashore
Map showing the location of Canaveral National Seashore
Location Brevard County and Volusia County, Florida, USA
Nearest city New Smyrna Beach, Florida and Titusville, Florida
Coordinates 28°46′03″N 80°46′37″W / 28.76750°N 80.77694°W / 28.76750; -80.77694Coordinates: 28°46′03″N 80°46′37″W / 28.76750°N 80.77694°W / 28.76750; -80.77694
Area 57,662 acres (23,335 ha)[1]
Established January 3, 1975
Visitors 1,005,001 (in 2011)[2]
Governing body National Park Service

The Canaveral National Seashore is a National Seashore (CANA) located between New Smyrna Beach and Titusville, Florida, in Volusia County and Brevard County, United States. The park, located on a barrier island, is home to more than 1,000 plant species and 310 bird species. CANA occupies 57,662 acres (23,335 ha)[1] (including lagoons) and was created on January 3, 1975 by an act of Congress. The park's 24-mile-long beach is the longest undeveloped beach on the east coast of the state. The southern part is also known as Playalinda Beach, the middle section as Klondike Beach, and the northern section as Apollo Beach.

The John F. Kennedy Space Center is located at the southern end of the barrier island occupied by Canaveral National Seashore, so access to the seashore is often restricted during launch-related activities at the space center. Mosquito Lagoon borders the other side of the Cape from the Seashore.

The Playalinda Beach has thirteen parking lots numbered from the south. The space shuttle launch facility is easily visible from the approach to Parking Lot #1.

Doris Leeper was instrumental in the creation of the park.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Listing of acreage as of December 31, 2011". Land Resource Division, National Park Service. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  2. ^ "NPS Annual Recreation Visits Report". National Park Service. Retrieved 2012-12-26. 
  3. ^ "Doris Leeper". florida-arts.org. Florida Division of Cultural Affairs. Retrieved May 2, 2012. 

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