Cantares Mexicanos

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Cantares Mexicanos is the name given to a manuscript collection of Nahuatl songs or poems recorded in the 16th century. The 91 songs of the Cantares form the largest Nahuatl song collection, containing over half of all known traditional Nahuatl songs. It is currently located in the National Library of Mexico in Mexico City.

A Spanish edition and translation of much of the manuscript was given by the great Mexican scholar, Ángel María Garibay Kintana, in the second and third volumes of his Poesía náhuatl (1965, 1968). It was no until Miguel León-Portilla edited a two-volume Spanish translation of the codex, published by the Universidad Nacional Autonóma de México, that entire Cantares was rendered in Spanish. A complete paleographic transcription and English translation of the Cantares was published in 1985 by John Bierhorst as Cantares Mexicanos: Songs of the Aztecs,[1] as well as a dictionary and concordance.[2] Although Bierhorst's transcription was appreciated by scholars for its accuracy and faithfulness to the original manuscript, his translations were criticized as misleading and colored by his view that the Cantares are "ghost songs", part of a colonial revitalization movement parallel to the ghost dances of the Plains Indians.[3] David Bowles, in his translations of selected poems from the Cantares and other Mesoamerican codices, agrees with León-Portilla and Garibay that the songs are part of a long aesthetic and philosophical tradition predating the Conquest.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ ISBN 0-8047-1182-8.
  2. ^ ISBN 0-8047-1183-6
  3. ^ Dakin (1986): pp. 1014–1016; Karttunen (1987): pp. 442–443; León-Portilla (1992): pp. 41–44; Lockhart (1991): pp. 141–157.
  4. ^ Bowles (2013): pp. i-v.

References[edit]

  • Bierhorst, John (1985). Cantares Mexicanos: Songs of the Aztecs. Stanford: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-1182-8. OCLC 11185910. 
  • Bierhorst, John (1985). A Nahuatl-English Dictionary and Concordance to the Cantares Mexicanos: With an Analytical Transcriptions and Grammatical Notes. Stanford: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-1183-6. OCLC 11185890. 
  • Bowles, David (2013). Flower, Song, Dance: Aztec and Mayan Poetry. Beaumont, Texas: Lamar University Press. ISBN 978-0-9852-5528-2. OCLC 2013942230. 
  • Curl, John (2005). Ancient American Poets: The Flower Songs of Nezahualcoyotl. Tempe: Bilingual Press. ISBN 1-931010-21-8. OCLC 226071756. 
  • Dakin, Karen (1986). "Review of Cantares mexicanos and A Nahuatl-English dictionary and concordance to the Cantares mexicanos". American Anthropologist 88 (4): pp. 1014–1016. doi:10.1525/aa.1986.88.4.02a00710. 
  • Garibay, A.M. (1965). Poesía náhuatl II. Mexico: UNAM. 
  • Garibay, A.M. (1968). Poesía náhuatl III. Mexico: UNAM. 
  • Karttunen, Frances; Bierhorst, John (1987). "Review of Cantares mexicanos and A Nahuatl-English dictionary and concordance to the Cantares mexicanos". Language 63 (2): pp. 442–443. doi:10.2307/415694. JSTOR 415694. 
  • León-Portilla, Miguel (2011). Cantares mexicanos: Vol. I. Mexico City: Universidad Nacional Autonóma de México. ISBN 978-607-02-2394-5. 
  • León-Portilla, Miguel (2011). Cantares mexicanos: Vol. II, tomo 1. Mexico City: Universidad Nacional Autonóma de México. ISBN 978-607-02-2394-5. 
  • León-Portilla, Miguel (2011). Cantares mexicanos: Vol. II, tomo 2. Mexico City: Universidad Nacional Autonóma de México. ISBN 978-607-02-2394-5. 
  • León-Portilla, Miguel (1992). Fifteen Poets of the Aztec World. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-2441-5. OCLC 243733946. 
  • Lockhart, James (1991). "Care, Ingenuity, and Irresponsibility: The Bierhorst Edition of the Cantares Mexicanos". Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology. Stanford: Stanford University Press. pp. 141–157. ISBN 0-8047-1954-3. 

See also[edit]