Canterbury by-election, 1927

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Canterbury by-election, 1927 was a parliamentary by-election for the British House of Commons constituency of Canterbury, Kent on 24 November 1927.

Vacancy[edit]

The by-election was caused by the elevation to the peerage of the sitting Unionist MP, Rt Hon. Ronald McNeill on 4 November 1927. He had been MP here since winning the seat at its creation in 1918.

Election history[edit]

From its first election in 1918 onwards, Canterbury was a safe Unionist seat. The result at the last General Election was

1924 General Election: Canterbury

Electorate 36,045[1]

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist Rt Hon. Ronald John McNeill 16,693 70.3
Liberal David Carnegie 7,061 29.7
Majority 9,632 40.6
Turnout 65.9
Unionist hold Swing

Candidates[edit]

  • On 7 November 1927 The Canterbury Unionist Association chose 58-year-old Sir William Wayland as their candidate to defend the seat. He served as Mayor of Deptford from 1914 to 1920, for which he was knighted in the 1920 New Year Honours.[2]
  • The Canterbury Liberal Association re-adopted David Carnegie as their candidate to challenge for the seat. He had fought the seat at the last General Election. He had represented the Canadian Government on numerous commissions. He was a member of the Executive Committee of the League of Nations Union.[3]

On 15 November 1927 the local Labour Party met and decided not to run a candidate.

Campaign[edit]

Polling Day was set for 24 November 1927, just 20 days after the announcement of the vacancy, allowing for virtually no campaign.

Agricultural issues dominated the election.

Liberal Leader David Lloyd George visited Canterbury to speak in support of the Liberal candidate.

On 19 November 1927 voters polled in the Southend by-election, 1927 which saw the Unionists hold the seat with a swing to the Liberals of less than 5%.

At an eve of poll Unionist meeting the former Canterbury MP Lord Cushendun criticised "Ignorant Liberal Bleatings".

Result[edit]

Despite a swing of 13% to the Liberals, Wayland was able to hang onto the seat with some ease.

Canterbury by-election, 1927

Electorate 39,229[4]

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist Sir William Abraham Edward Wayland 13,657 57.3 -13.0
Liberal David Carnegie 10,175 42.7 +13.0
Majority 3,482 14.6 -26.0
Turnout 23,832 60.8 -5.1
Unionist hold Swing -13.0

Aftermath[edit]

The Labour Party intervened in the next contest and enabled the Unionists to increase their majority. The result at the following General Election;

1929 General Election: Canterbury

Electorate 49,499[5]

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist Sir William Abraham Edward Wayland 19,181 56.7 -0.6
Liberal David Carnegie 9,937 29.4 -13.3
Labour P S Eastman 4,703 13.9 n/a
Majority 9,244 27.3 +12.7
Turnout 33,821 68.3
Unionist hold Swing +6.3

References[edit]

  1. ^ F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949; Political Reference Publications, Glasgow 1949
  2. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 31712. p. 3. 30 December 1919.
  3. ^ The Times House of Commons, 1929
  4. ^ F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949; Political Reference Publications, Glasgow 1949
  5. ^ F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949; Political Reference Publications, Glasgow 1949

See also[edit]