Capella Tower

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Capella Tower
225 South Sixth from street.jpg
Capella Tower seen from the ground
Alternative names 225 South Sixth
General information
Status Complete
Location 225 6th Street S.
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Coordinates 44°58′35″N 93°16′07″W / 44.9763°N 93.2686°W / 44.9763; -93.2686Coordinates: 44°58′35″N 93°16′07″W / 44.9763°N 93.2686°W / 44.9763; -93.2686
Construction started 1989
Opening 1992
Height
Roof 775 ft (236 m)
Technical details
Floor count 56 (53 occupied)
Design and construction
Architect James Ingo Freed
Pei Cobb Freed & Partners
Developer Joint Venture of IBM Corporation and
The OPUS Corporation
Structural engineer CBM Engineers Inc.

Capella Tower (also 225 South Sixth) is a skyscraper in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. The building opened in 1992 with the First Bank Place being the headquarters for First Bank System. In 1997, First Bank System acquired US Bancorp and changed the name of the building to US Bancorp Place. The headquarters of US Bancorp moved into the US Bancorp Center in 2000, whereupon the tower changed to 225 South 6th Street. In March 2009, the building took its present name.

The ranking of the building as the tallest in Minneapolis is in dispute. The IDS Center is usually said to be taller by one foot, even by the owners of Capella Tower. It was initially said to be built one foot shorter out of respect for the IDS Center; however, in 2005, it was revealed that contractors had surreptitiously added 14 inches of height to Capella, therefore making it taller than the main roof of IDS Center. In February 2005, the IDS counted a 16-foot (4.9 m) tall window washing garage built on its roof in 1979 as part of its actual height, making it 14 feet (4.3 m) taller than Capella Tower. This ambiguity between official measurements and public relations statements might be due in some part to the "halo" that extends out from the roof, which is apparently included in the building's official height (though this is unclear).[1]

The IDS is taller on two measures. The IDS's communications spires add a significant amount of height making it 910 feet (280 m), and it remains the tallest building in Minneapolis if measured by number of stories (57 vs. 56; actually tied for first with neighbor Wells Fargo Center).[1]

The building's total office space is 1,400,000 square feet (130,000 m2).[2]

Capella Tower[edit]

The building as viewed from the Foshay Tower

In March 2008, Capella Education Co., longtime occupant of the building and owner of the for-profit online Capella University, signed a lease that will change the name of the tower to Capella Tower; the name of the project will remain Capella Tower. Running through 2015, the new lease expands Capella's square footage in the building from 203,000 square feet (18,900 m2) to about 400,000 square feet (37,000 m2), making it the largest tenant in the building. The expanded facility will house all of the company's 1,150 downtown Minneapolis employees; as the online school does not have classrooms, the space houses administrative staff and faculty. The name change took place in March 2009.[3]

Design[edit]

The office building, designed by Pei, Cobb, Freed & Partners,[4] is laid out on an L-shaped site with the 56-story tower connected to the 20-story Park Building by a corner winter garden. The building combines six-story cubes and various round towers which echo the different styles of buildings in downtown Minneapolis. The illuminated semicircle located atop the tower is not only decorative but also houses an antenna farm and communications network. This feature has given the building the nickname the "Halo Building".

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nick Coleman, Capella Tower sports a cap, but it can’t topple the IDS, Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 24, 2008.
  2. ^ Burl Gilyard, Capella inks major expansion in downtown Minneapolis, Finance and Commerce, March 20, 2008.
  3. ^ Sam Black, Capella lease to rename 225 South Sixth, Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal, March 20, 2008.
  4. ^ http://www.pcf-p.com/a/p/8826/s.html

External links[edit]