Caproni Ca.309

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Ca.309
Caproni Ca.309.jpg
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer Caproni
First flight 1937
Retired 1948
Primary users Regia Aeronautica
Hungary,
Yugoslavia,
Peru,
Paraguayan Air Arm

The Caproni Ca.309 Ghibli was an Italian aircraft used in World War II. Its nickname served as the inspiration for Studio Ghibli's name.

Development[edit]

The Caproni Ca.309 was designed by Cesare Pallavicino, based on the Ca.308 Borea transport. It was intended to replace the obsolete biplane IMAM Ro.1. It was intended to serve as a reconnaissance and ground-attack aircraft.

The Ca.309 was a low-wing cantilever monoplane with a piston engine fitted to each wing.

The aircraft was also produced in Bulgaria. That variant, 24 of which were built, was known as the Kaproni-Bulgarski KB 6/KB 309 Papagal.

Operations[edit]

The Ca. 309 served in Libya during the first part of World War II, with good operational results.[1]

After the loss of the African colonies the surviving planes were returned to Italy, where they were used as transports. Two Ghiblis were bought by the Paraguayan government for its Military Air Arm. They were used as transport planes from 1939 to 1945 and in that year they were transferred to Líneas Aéreas de Transporte Nacional (LATN), the Paraguayan first airline which was run by the Military Aviation. They were in active service until the early 1950s and later sold to a private Argentine owner.

Operators[edit]

 Kingdom of Italy
 Italy
 Bulgaria
 Paraguay
  • Paraguayan Air Arm (two Ca.309)
  • Líneas Aéreas de Transporte Nacional (LATN) used two ex-Paraguayan Air Arm Ca.309s

Specifications (Ca.309)[edit]

General characteristics

Performance

Armament

  • Guns: 3 × 7.7 mm (.303 in) Breda SAFAT machine guns
  • Bombs: up to 330 kg

See also[edit]

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]