Captain of sea and war

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Hierarchy of naval officer ranks
Flag officers:

Admiral of the navy
Admiral of the fleetFleet admiralGrand admiral
AdmiralGeneral admiral
Lieutenant admiralVice admiral
Counter admiralRear admiralSchout-bij-nacht
Commodore admiralFlotilla admiral
Admiral-superintendentPort admiral

Senior officers:

CommodoreFleet captain
Post captainCaptainCaptain at sea
Captain of sea and warShip-of-the-line captain
CommanderFrigate captain
Captain of the port

Junior officers:

Corvette captainLieutenant commander
Captain lieutenantLieutenantShip-of-the-line lieutenant
Frigate lieutenantLieutenant (junior grade)Sub-lieutenant
Corvette lieutenantEnsign
Flag lieutenant

Officers in training:

Passed midshipmanMidshipman
Naval cadet

Captain of sea and war (Portuguese: capitão de mar e guerra) is a rank in a small number of navies, notably those of Portugal and Brazil, which corresponds to the rank of ship-of-the-line captain, or the US and Commonwealth rank of full captain.

The term captain of sea and war, like the modern rank of ship-of-the-line captain in the navies of France, Italy, and Spain, has deep historic roots. Although the rank was first formally established in the 17th century, the expression had been sometimes been used in the Portuguese armadas of the 16th century. But generally, in the 16th and early 17th centuries, the captain of a Portuguese man-of-war was simply called a capitão, while the commander of a fleet was termed capitão-mor, literally "captain-major".

During the 16th century, the term almirante was used in Portugal to designate the second in command of a fleet. Only during the 18th century century would it come to designate the fleet commander - an admiral in the more modern sense. But during the latter half of the 17th century, the term "captain of sea and war" came to designate the commander of a larger man-of-war - the ship of the line that began evolving at that time. When that happened, the Portuguese Navy, as other navies, came to use the term capitão de fragata and capitão-tenente, literally "frigate captain" and "captain-lieutenant", to designate the commanders of smaller warships. When Brazil gained her independence from Portugal in 1822, her Navy adopted the Portuguese rank denominations, which both countries still use.

Today, the rank of captain of sea and war exists in the navies of Portugal, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau.