Carcinosis

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Carcinosis, or carcinomatosis, is disseminated cancer, forms of metastasis, whether used generally or in specific patterns of spread.

Usage[edit]

Carcinomatosis is often restricted to tumors of epithelial origin, adenocarcinomas, while sarcomatosis describes the dissemination of tumors of mesenchymal origin, sarcomas.[1]

Lung[edit]

Lymphangitic carcinomatosis[edit]

When most tumors metastasize to the lung, they form distinct nodules, but about 7% spread through the lymph vessels of the lung.[2] They may impair breathing in several ways; the lung becomes stiffer; blood vessels traveling alongside the distended lymph vessels become compressed.[3]

Miliary carcinosis[edit]

A pattern of multiple small nodular metastases has been described as miliary carcinosis which has a radiographic appearance similar to miliary tuberculosis.[4]

Body cavities[edit]

Any potential space may be seeded with tumor cells that grow along surfaces, but which may not invade below the surfaces. In rare cases, the joint spaces are affected.[5]

Peritoneal carcinomatosis[edit]

The lining of the abdominal cavity is a common site for surface dissemination. Ovarian carcinomas are common. Fluid produced by the cells can produce ascites which is typical in carcinomatosis, but less common in peritoneal sarcomatosis.[1] Fluid can be serous as seen in primary peritoneal carcinoma or mucinous such as found in pseudomyxoma peritonei which is typically a tumor derived from the appendix.[6]

Pleural carcinosis[edit]

Pleural carcinosis is associated with malignant pleural effusion and poor prognosis.[7]

Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis[edit]

The meningeal covering of the central nervous system may be the site of tumor growth. Breast cancer, lung cancer and melanoma are the most common tumors.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Oei, T. N.; Jagannathan, J. P.; Ramaiya, N.; Ros, P. R. (2010). "Peritoneal Sarcomatosis Versus Peritoneal Carcinomatosis: Imaging Findings at MDCT". American Journal of Roentgenology 195 (3): W229–W235. doi:10.2214/AJR.09.3907. ISSN 0361-803X. 
  2. ^ Prakash, P.; Kalra, M. K.; Sharma, A.; Shepard, J.-A. O.; Digumarthy, S. R. (2009). "FDG PET/CT in Assessment of Pulmonary Lymphangitic Carcinomatosis". American Journal of Roentgenology 194 (1): 231–236. doi:10.2214/AJR.09.3059. ISSN 0361-803X. 
  3. ^ Mark A. Marinella (7 May 2009). "12. Lymphangitic carcinomatosis". Handbook of Cancer Emergencies. Jones & Bartlett Learning. pp. 55–57. ISBN 978-0-7637-6989-5. Retrieved 29 February 2012. 
  4. ^ Marks, J. L. (1950). "Metastatic Tumors of the Lung". Chest 17 (1): 63–73. doi:10.1378/chest.17.1.63. ISSN 0012-3692. 
  5. ^ Currall, Verity A.; Dixon, John H. (2008). "Synovial Metastasis". The Journal of Arthroplasty 23 (4): 631–636. doi:10.1016/j.arth.2007.04.034. ISSN 0883-5403. 
  6. ^ Young, Robert H. (2004). "Pseudomyxoma peritonei and selected other aspects of the spread of appendiceal neoplasms". Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology 21 (2): 134–150. doi:10.1053/j.semdp.2004.12.002. ISSN 0740-2570. PMID 15807473. 
  7. ^ Ruffini, E (2002). "The significance of intraoperative pleural effusion during surgery for bronchogenic carcinoma". European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 21 (3): 508–513. doi:10.1016/S1010-7940(01)01166-6. ISSN 1010-7940. 
  8. ^ Martins, Sandro José; Azevedo, Carla Rameri Alexandre Silva de; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos; Cruz, Marcelo Rocha Sousa; Peterlevitz, Marcos Aurélio; Gimenes, Daniel Luiz (2011). "Meningeal carcinomatosis in solid tumors". Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria 69 (6): 973–980. doi:10.1590/S0004-282X2011000700024. ISSN 0004-282X. 

External links[edit]

  • Carcinosis entry in the public domain NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms