Carl-Henric Svanberg

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Carl-Henric Svanberg
Carl-Henric Svanberg.jpg
Born (1952-05-29) 29 May 1952 (age 61)
Porjus, Sweden
Occupation Chairman of BP
Chairman of Volvo

Carl-Henric Svanberg (born 29 May 1952), is a Swedish businessman and current Chairman of BP and Volvo.[1]

Life and career[edit]

Svanberg holds a Master's degree in Applied Physics from the Linköping Institute of Technology and a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration from Uppsala University. Svanberg holds honorary doctorates from Luleå University of Technology and Linköping University.

Svanberg served as CEO of telecom company Ericsson from 8 April 2003 to 31 December 2009. Following his resignation, he remained on the board of Ericsson and holds 3,234,441 shares in the company.[2][3]

Before joining Ericsson, he led another Swedish industrial company - Assa Abloy. Svanberg serves on other boards, including:

Svanberg joined the BP board as chairman-designate on 1 September 2009, and succeeded Peter Sutherland as chairman on 1 January 2010.[4]

He and his wife Agneta, an associate professor at Uppsala University, filed for divorce on 17 September 2009. They were married for 26 years and have three children together. Svanberg is a dedicated fan of Djurgårdens IF and serves on the board of Djurgårdens IF Hockey. He is a former ice hockey player himself, having played for IF Björklöven in Umeå during his youth.

Deepwater Horizon oil spill[edit]

On 16 June 2010, Svanberg met with US President Barack Obama to discuss BP's responsibility for the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. He caused a PR uproar by afterwards expressing BP's concern for the common people along the Gulf Coast of the United States whose livelihood is threatened by the oil spill by saying, "We care about the small people", drawing upon a Swedish phrase, den lilla människan. The correct translation of the Swedish phrase would have been "the common man". Svanberg subsequently apologized for the term and attributed his unfortunate choice of words to a "slip in translation".[5]

External links[edit]

References[edit]