Carl Fogarty

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For fictional character, see A History of Violence.
Carl Fogarty
Cf1.jpg
Fogarty on top of his motorhome at the Ricardo Tormo Circuit in Valencia
Nationality English
Born (1965-07-01) 1 July 1965 (age 49)
Blackburn, Lancashire
Website www.carlfogarty.com
Motorcycle racing career statistics
MotoGP World Championship
Active years 1990 - 1993
Manufacturers Cagiva, Honda
Championships 0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
8 0 0 0 0 37
Superbike World Championship
Active years 1990 - 2000
Manufacturers Ducati, Honda
Championships 4. 1994,1995,1998,1999
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
219 59 109 21 48
Carl Fogarty on a Ducati 916.jpg

Carl George Fogarty (born 1 July 1965 in Blackburn, Lancashire), sometimes known as Foggy, is the most successful World Superbike racer of all time in terms of the number of championships and number of race wins. Now retired, he is renowned for his high corner speed riding style, combined with an aggressive competitiveness, which netted him 59 victories and four World Superbike Championships (1994, 1995, 1998 and 1999). His greatest success came with the factory Ducati team. He was awarded an MBE in 1998's New Year's Honours List.

World Superbikes[edit]

In 1991 he raced for Neil Tuxworth's Honda UK team in World Superbikes, finishing 7th overall. The team pulled out in 1992, and Carl nearly found himself without a ride after a promised deal failed to materialise. He did ultimately take his first WSBK win at Donington Park, and finished the championship 9th overall despite only completing a partial season.

1993 was the beginning of his era as a factory Ducati rider. He battled with Scott Russell for the title, winning 11 races to the American's five, but losing out on consistency (Russell came 2nd twelve times compared to Fogarty's two) to finish behind him.

In 1994 two factors came together to build on the successes of the previous season. Foggy was fit and hungry for the title, having been so close the previous season; but he would also be using the new Ducati 916.

He missed the Hockenheim races with a broken wrist, but fought back to pip Russell and Aaron Slight to the crown.

Winning 6 of the first 8 races in 1995 helped him seal that title with 5 of the 24 races to spare, and he clinched it with 3 races to spare in 1999.

In 1996 he raced for Tuxworth again, now with Honda factory support. Despite winning four races that season on the RC45, three more than team-mate Aaron Slight, and one more than Slight had managed over three seasons on the bike, Fogarty again struggled with consistency and finished 4th overall, 16 points behind 2nd placed Slight and 38 points behind champion Troy Corser.

In 1997 he returned to Ducati, finishing second overall to the Honda of John Kocinski.

1998 was his closest title - after a disastrous weekend at the Nürburgring he lay just 6th in the standings, but fought back to overhaul Troy Corser and Aaron Slight in the final round. This was especially notable as his team (Ducati Performance), managed by Davide Tardozzi, was in its first year of WSBK competition.

Surprisingly, his first victory in any form of racing at Brands Hatch did not come until 1995. He had much greater success at Assen, winning all but 1 race there between 1995 and 1999. Large numbers of British fans would travel to the race on the ferries at this time.

Superbike World Championship results[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Pos Pts
R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2
1988 Honda GBR
Ret
GBR
HUN
HUN
GER
GER
AUT
AUT
JPN
JPN
FRA
FRA
POR
POR
AUS
AUS
NZL
NZL
- 0
1989 Honda GBR
7
GBR
13
HUN
HUN
CAN
CAN
USA
USA
AUT
AUT
FRA
FRA
JPN
JPN
GER
GER
ITA
ITA
AUS
AUS
NZL
NZL
44th 12
1990 Honda ESP
14
ESP
Ret
GBR
6
GBR
6
HUN
HUN
GER
GER
CAN
CAN
USA
USA
AUT
AUT
JPN
JPN
FRA
Ret
FRA
8
ITA
ITA
MAS
MAS
AUS
AUS
NZL
NZL
19th 30
1991 Honda GBR
Ret
GBR
9
ESP
9
ESP
8
CAN
CAN
USA
11
USA
11
AUT
AUT
SMR
7
SMR
8
SWE
4
SWE
4
JPN
11
JPN
8
MAS
8
MAS
7
GER
9
GER
10
FRA
6
FRA
7
ITA
7
ITA
Ret
AUS
AUS
7th 146
1992 Ducati ESP
12
ESP
10
GBR
Ret
GBR
1
GER
20
GER
11
BEL
Ret
BEL
8
ESP
5
ESP
Ret
AUT
6
AUT
7
ITA
7
ITA
4
MAS
MAS
JPN
JPN
NED
4
NED
2
ITA
Ret
ITA
Ret
AUS
7
AUS
Ret
NZL
NZL
9th 134
1993 Ducati GBR
Ret
GBR
GER
3
GER
7
ESP
1
ESP
1
SMR
5
SMR
3
AUT
4
AUT
4
CZE
1
CZE
2
SWE
1
SWE
1
MAS
1
MAS
1
JPN
1
JPN
24
NED
1
NED
1
ITA
4
ITA
4
GBR
2
GBR
Ret
POR
Ret
POR
1
2nd 349,5
1994 Ducati GBR
1
GBR
2
GER
GER
SMR
Ret
SMR
5
ESP
1
ESP
1
AUT
1
AUT
1
INA
Ret
INA
1
JPN
4
JPN
2
NED
1
NED
1
ITA
2
ITA
1
GBR
14
GBR
5
AUS
1
AUS
2
1st 305
1995 Ducati GER
1
GER
1
SMR
2
SMR
2
GBR
1
GBR
1
ITA
1
ITA
2
ESP
2
ESP
1
AUT
1
AUT
2
USA
5
USA
7
GBR
1
GBR
1
JPN
Ret
JPN
1
NED
1
NED
1
INA
1
INA
Ret
AUS
4
AUS
2
1st 478
1996 Honda SMR
7
SMR
6
GBR
8
GBR
7
GER
5
GER
1
ITA
1
ITA
3
CZE
2
CZE
3
USA
8
USA
4
GBR
5
GBR
Ret
INA
2
INA
3
JPN
8
JPN
4
NED
1
NED
1
ESP
5
ESP
7
AUS
4
AUS
6
4th 331
1997 Ducati AUS
2
AUS
4
SMR
3
SMR
3
GBR
2
GBR
1
GER
4
GER
1
ITA
3
ITA
4
USA
2
USA
2
GBR
Ret
GBR
1
AUT
1
AUT
Ret
NED
2
NED
1
ESP
Ret
ESP
Ret
JPN
13
JPN
Ret
INA
3
INA
1
2nd 358
1998 Ducati AUS
1
AUS
3
GBR
7
GBR
3
ITA
6
ITA
2
ESP
9
ESP
1
GER
13
GER
13
SMR
4
SMR
3
RSA
2
RSA
2
USA
5
USA
Ret
GBR
4
GBR
2
AUT
3
AUT
2
NED
2
NED
1
JPN
3
JPN
4
1st 351,5
1999 Ducati RSA
1
RSA
1
AUS
2
AUS
2
GBR
1
GBR
2
ESP
3
ESP
3
ITA
1
ITA
1
GER
1
GER
15
SMR
1
SMR
1
USA
5
USA
4
GBR
19
GBR
4
AUT
2
AUT
4
NED
1
NED
1
GER
1
GER
2
JPN
2
JPN
5
1st 489
2000 Ducati RSA
3
RSA
Ret
AUS
2
AUS
Ret
JPN
JPN
GBR
GBR
ITA
ITA
GER
GER
SMR
SMR
ESP
ESP
USA
USA
GBR
GBR
NED
NED
GER
GER
GBR
GBR
26th 36

Other races[edit]

'Foggy' on his Yamaha at Creg-ny-Baa on the Isle of Man.

Early in his career he won the Formula One World Championship for bikes, which was gradually fading after the 1988 commencement of the World Superbike Championship. Fogarty won it three times back to back from 1988 to 1990. In 1990 it dropped below the six races required for the FIM to class it as a Championship, rather than merely a Cup; again, he won it.

He made a handful of starts in Moto GP, filling in for Pierfrancesco Chili on a ROC bike for a while in 1990, with a best finish of 6th at the Swedish Grand Prix. He also contested the 500cc British Grand Prix several times. In 1992 he ran 6th before crashing on oil. In 1993 he qualified on the second row, and ran second early on after Alex Barros, Mick Doohan and Kevin Schwantz crashed on the first lap. he was set for third when he ran out of fuel, coasting over the line in 4th behind three Yamahas. He was entered again in 1994, but withdrew pre-race - citing a hand injury but later admitting that he felt the ride was uncompetitive.

Fogarty broke the lap record at the Isle of Man TT in 1992. His lap at 18 minutes, 18.8 seconds (123.61 mph) on a Yamaha 750cc wasn't broken until seven years later by Jim Moodie from a standing start riding a Honda RC45 in 1999, taking the record to 124.45 mph. His TT exploits began in the mid-Eighties. He was the winner of the 1985 Lightweight Newcomers Manx Grand Prix and went on to win three TT races. The first was the 1989 Production 750 Race and he collected the 1990 Formula 1 and Senior trophies. He made a total of 26 Isle of Man TT starts.[1]

In 1992 he teamed with Terry Rymer and Michael Simul to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Other wins included Bol d'Or. They went on to win the World Endurance Championship for Kawasaki.

Riding for Ducati, Fogarty finished second at the 1995 Daytona 200 in the United States. Scott Russell crashed during the first lap of the race but was able to remount and pass Fogarty for the win. Fogarty said that the pace car regrouping following the yellow flag allowed Russell to close the gap significantly.[2]

Carl Fogarty won the Ulster Grand Prix F1 race in 1988 and then a year later he won the ‘King of the Roads’ Senior race setting a new lap record in the process, a speed of 121.629 mph.[3]

In 1993, Foggy produced an imperious display of road racing to win both superbike races at the North West 200 on board a Moto Cinelli Ducati 888. In race 1 he beat the Dunlops (Robert in 2nd, Joey 3rd) and in race 2, he was again ahead of Robert (2nd) and Phillip McCallen in 3rd. In a truly dominant display, he also set a new lap record of 122.491 mph.[4]

Carl Fogarty rode a Harris Yamaha 500 GP bike in 1992 to victory in the Macau Grand Prix.[5]

The ability to win on any manufacture, road or circuit, world or national series and sprint or endurance event marks Fogarty out as one of the sport's true champions.

Career stats[edit]

Year Poles Races Podiums Wins 2nd 3rd Titles
All Time Superbike 21 219 109 59 33 17 4

Post-racing[edit]

Fogarty was forced to retire from racing in 2000 after a racing incident at Phillip Island when he hit privateer Ducati rider Robert Ulm and crashed. He suffered multiple injuries, including a serious shoulder injury which failed to heal well enough to allow him to race again. He was replaced in the factory Ducati team by Troy Bayliss.

In 2002, Ducati released a special limited edition model (only 300 units were built) in his honour, the Monster S4 Fogarty.

In the same year, Fogarty founded the Foggy Petronas team in the World Superbike Championship (WSB). They entered with Carl's former team-mate Corser and James Haydon in 2003, but their three-cylinder Petronas FP1 was never truly competitive. In 2004 they achieved two third places (one for Corser and one for Chris Walker), but in this season there was little manufacturer support in WSB. Once several manufacturers returned for 2005, they were not competitive. Petronas ended the project at the end of 2006, leaving Foggy's racing future unclear. Having tried and failed to find sponsorship for a team running customer Ducatis in 2007, in May Fogarty confirmed the team's return in 2008 as the official MV Agusta team[6] - only to later pull the plug on his team's activities and put their assets up for sale.[7]

Carl Fogarty was never a person to stray away from controversy in the WSB paddock, and even in retirement, he frequently voices his opinion (most often in the British motorcycle newspaper MCN) in which he often berates past rivals such as Troy Corser and Neil Hodgson. This attitude towards other racers has made him a love-or-hate personality in the motorcycling world.

References[edit]

External links[edit]


Sporting positions
Preceded by
Virginio Ferrari
TT Formula One World Champion
1988-1990
Succeeded by
None
Preceded by
Didier de Radiguès
Macau Motorcyle Grand Prix Winner
1992
Succeeded by
Steve Hislop
Preceded by
Scott Russell
World Superbike Champion
1994-1995
Succeeded by
Troy Corser
Preceded by
John Kocinski
World Superbike Champion
1998-1999
Succeeded by
Colin Edwards