Carl Gustav Guckelberger

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Carl Gustav Guckelberger
Born 1820
Stuttgart, Kingdom of Württemberg
Died August 9, 1902 (aged 81–82)
near Kassel, Germany
Nationality German
Alma mater University of Gießen
Doctoral advisor Justus von Liebig

Carl Gustav Guckelberger (1820 – August 9, 1902) was a German chemist.

Life[edit]

Guckelsberger worked in a pharmacy in Stuttgart, but started studying chemistry with Hermann von Fehling, also in Stuttgart, for two semesters. With the recommendation of Fehling, Guckelsberger joined the laboratory of Justus von Liebig at the University of Gießen, where he received his Ph.D. His research there concerned the oxidation of albumin and related compounds.[1]

In the 1850s he started working at a paper factory near Großalmerode, which he became technical director of.[1] Later he directed a soda factory; some sources credit him with significant improvements to the manufacture of soda,[1][2] while others dispute the claim, giving more of the credit to his assistant Ludwig Mond.[3]

Guckelberger retired in 1867[1] and lived near Kassel the rest of his life.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Fruton, Joseph Stewart (1990), Contrasts in Scientific Style: Research Groups in the Chemical and Biochemical Sciences, Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society 191, American Philosophical Society, pp. 281–282, ISBN 9780871691910 .
  2. ^ von Meyer, Ernst; translated by George McGowan (1891), A History of Chemistry from Earliest Times to the Present Day: Being Also an Introduction to the Study of the Science (3rd ed.), Macmillan and Company, p. 506 .
  3. ^ Lunge, Georg (1880), A Theoretical and Practical Treatise on the Manufacture of Sulphuric Acid and Alkali: With the Collateral Branches 2, J. Van Voorst, p. 667 .

Additional sources[edit]