Carl Herman Kraeling

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Carl Herman Kraeling (1897–1966), theologian, historian, and an American archeologist; born in Brooklyn on March 10, 1897 and died in New Haven in 1966; he is known for its publications on the synagogue and the Christian chapel of Doura Europos.

He studied at Columbia University, and earned his B.D. from the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia in 1926. He taught New Testament Studies at the Yale University and established the department of Near Eastern languages and Civilizations there.[1]

Kraeling served as the president of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) from 1949-1954. He supported the continued study of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and encouraged humanitarian awareness for Near Eastern refugees during a turbulent period in the area's history.

Works[edit]

  • Anthropos and Son of Man (1937)
  • Gerasa, City of the Decapolis (1938)
  • The Synagogue, The Excavations at Dura-Europos, Final Report VIII.1 (New Haven 1956)

References[edit]

  1. ^ William F. Albright, Carl Herman Kraeling – In Menoriam The American Schools of Oriental Research (1970), p. 4

Bibliography[edit]

  • (English) J. S. Thacher, « Carl H. Kraeling (1897-1966) », Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 21 (1967), 7 ;
  • (English) W. F. Albright, « Carl Herman Kraeling : In Memoriam », Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research, 189 (avril 1970), 4-7.
  • William F. Albright, Carl Herman Kraeling – In Menoriam The American Schools of Oriental Research (1970), p. 4 ff