Carleton Winslow

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California Building, now the Museum of Man, Panama–California Exposition, 1915
Kansas Building, Panama–California Exposition, 1915
Carthay Circle Theater, Los Angeles, 1926

Carleton Monroe Winslow (1876–1946), also known as Carleton Winslow Sr., was an American architect, and key proponent of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture in Southern California in the early 20th Century.

Biography[edit]

Winslow was born in Damariscotta, Maine, studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and at the École des Beaux-Arts, and joined the office of Bertram Goodhue in time for the planning of the 1915 San Diego Panama–California Exposition. Winslow is the one "credited for choosing" Spanish Colonial style for that project, a choice with a vernacular regional precedent.[1]

He moved to Southern California in 1917, completed the Los Angeles Public Library after Goodhue's 1924 death, and also pursued his own commissions, including a number of Episcopal churches. With Clarence Stein he wrote "The architecture and the gardens of the San Diego Exposition".

His son, Carleton Winslow, Jr. (1919–1983) was also an architect, specializing in churches in Southern California, and an architectural history professor and author.

Work[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.oac.cdlib.org/data/13030/vs/kt6n39r9vs/files/kt6n39r9vs.pdf
  2. ^ An architectural guidebook to Los Ángeles By David Gebhard, Robert Winter page 436
  3. ^ George Washington Smith: architect of the Spanish colonial revival By Patricia Gebhard, page 32
  4. ^ https://digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/architects/789/
  5. ^ https://digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/structures/1240/
  6. ^ An architectural guidebook to Los Ángeles By David Gebhard, Robert Winter page 416
  7. ^ Architectural Forum, March 1930
  8. ^ An architectural guidebook to Los Ángeles By David Gebhard, Robert Winter page 335

External links[edit]