Carlo Peter Caputo

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Carlo Peter Caputo (September 15, 1903 – November 6, 1993) was a purported Italian-American gangster and notable Madison, Wisconsin based businessman born in Palermo, Sicily.[1]

Early career[edit]

Arriving in Chicago, Caputo quickly integrated himself into the Chicago Outfit, allegedly working between The Outfit and its off-shoot in Milwaukee during the 1930s and 40s. At some point Caputo was sent to Madison, Wisconsin. Caputo settled into the Madison neighborhood of Greenbush, a large enclave of Sicilian and Jewish Immigrants. Caputo quickly purchased real estate in the area including several taverns and restaurants, gaining a reputation as a successful businessman.[2]

Later Life and Indictment[edit]

Long regarded by the FBI as the head of the Madison branch of La Cosa Nostra, in 1961 Caputo came under indictment from the federal government for tax evasion[3] which ended in Caputo serving 30 days in jail and receiving 2 years probation.

Former FBI Director William Sessions cited Caputo as the Mob boss of Madison during a 1988 congressional hearing on organized crime.[4] Despite his brief imprisonment and Sessions' comments, Caputo continued to serve as a prominent member of the Madison business community and contributed to the development of the downtown area.[5]

Death[edit]

Caputo died of natural causes on November 9, 1993. Following his death, Caputo was considered by the FBI to have been the head of America's smallest Mafia operation.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Murray, Catherine "Greenbush...remembered" May 2011, p. 104
  2. ^ "26 Mafia Cities - Madison, WI". Americanmafia.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  3. ^ "Page 29, Capital Times, May 5, 1967". NewspaperARCHIVE.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  4. ^ "Welcome Fortune City Customers | Dotster". Members.fortunecity.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  5. ^ AMANDA N. WEGNER For the State Journal (2008-05-28). "THROUGH THICK AND THIN MADISON'S PIZZARIAS HAVE COME A LONG WAY FROM THEIR HUMBLE START ON SPAGHETTI-CORNER : 77-square". Host.madison.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  6. ^ James Mannon, The Everything Mafia Book, FW Publications, 2003

External links[edit]