Carlos Romero Deschamps

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Carlos Antonio Romero Deschamps
Born (1944-01-17) 17 January 1944 (age 70)
Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico
Ethnicity Mexican
Occupation Senator
Political party
PRI Party (Mexico).svg PRI

Carlos Antonio Romero Deschamps (born 17 January 1944) is a Mexican politician affiliated to the PRI. He currently serves as Senator of the LXII Legislature of the Mexican Congress. He also served as Deputy during three Legislatures (1979–82, 1991–94, 2000–03) and as Senator between 1994 until 2000.[1]

Allegations of Corruption[edit]

Despite Deschamps claims to be on a modest trade union monthly salary of $1,864, he has long been suspected of using his influence as the most powerful Pemex union leader and one of the most notorious PRI members for personal enrichment, either through embezzlement or peddling. This salary, although above the Mexican average, cannot account for his oppulent and lavish lifesyle. His daughter routinely displays online publicly her world travels on private jets and yachts, and her frequent fine dining. His son drives a $2 million limited edition Enzo Ferrari, which was a gift from Deschamps despite his supposed income.[2]

He owns a home in Cancun worth nearly $1.5 million which he has described as a “cottage”. In 2011 he allegedly received $21.6 million “aid to the union executive committee” and $15.3 million from dues according to political analyst Denise Dresser. Despite these allegation he has stated that his “hands are clean,” and is not currently under investigation.[2]

Deschamps also holds prominent political connections that have arguably allowed him to maintain his high influential position for so long. He has had ties with the ruling party, PRI (Revolutionary Institutional Party,) since 1961. Despite being a Union executive he has also managed to be a PRI senator.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Perfil del legislador". Legislative Information system. Retrieved 2 September 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Estevez, Dolia. "The 10 Most Corrupt Mexicans Of 2013". Forbes. 
  3. ^ Sanchez, Alejandro (Dec 18, 2013). "A response to Forbes: Corruption in Mexico’s PEMEX". Voxxi.