Carlos Mozer

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Carlos Mozer
Carlos Mozer.jpg
Personal information
Full name José Carlos Nepomuceno Mozer
Date of birth (1960-09-19) 19 September 1960 (age 54)
Place of birth Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Height 1.87 m (6 ft 1 12 in)
Playing position Centre back
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1980–1987 Flamengo 93 (8)
1987–1989 Benfica 61 (8)
1989–1992 Marseille 89 (4)
1992–1995 Benfica 59 (3)
1995–1996 Kashima Antlers 17 (0)
National team
1983–1994 Brazil 32 (0)
Teams managed
2006–2008 Interclube
2009 Raja Casablanca
2011 Naval
2011 Portimonense
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

José Carlos Nepomuceno Mozer (born 19 September 1960) is a Brazilian retired footballer who played as a central defender, and a current coach.

In his career he was mainly associated with Benfica in Portugal, which he represented in two separate spells. Mozer played for Brazil at the 1990 World Cup.

Club career[edit]

Born in Rio de Janeiro, Mozer starting playing for local giants Clube de Regatas do Flamengo, which he helped win the Libertadores Cup and the Intercontinental Cup, both in 1981.

After well more than 100 official appearances he left for Portugal and S.L. Benfica, being an undisputed starter from the beginning and helping the club to the league in 1988–89, while scoring more than ten overall goals in his first stint; also that season, he partnered compatriot Ricardo Gomes in the heart of the Reds' defense.

In the summer Mozer was sold to Olympique de Marseille of France, and faced his former side in the campaign's European Cup semifinals, a 2–2 controversial aggregate exit – again, he rarely missed a game, and helped L'OM to three consecutive Ligue 1 conquests. Subsequently the 32-year-old returned to Benfica, where he still managed to amass more than 75 overall appearances until his departure in 1995, after which he saw out his career in Japan at Kashima Antlers; he was the first player to score in penalty shootouts in two European Cup Finals, in 1988 and 1991. The following players to do this were Frank Lampard and Ashley Cole of Chelsea, in 2008 and 2012 respectively.

After working some years as a sports commentator for Sport TV – he resided in Portugal – Mozer eventually became a manager. On 24 October 2006, he signed a two-year contract with Angolan club Grupo Desportivo Interclube.[1] He led the club to the 2007 Girabola title,[2] but was dismissed from his post in April 2008, after an away defeat against El Zamalek for the CAF Champions League.[3]

On 6 July 2009 Mozer signed a one-year deal with Raja Casablanca of Morocco,[4] being sacked shortly after. In January 2011 he returned to Portugal, being appointed Associação Naval 1º de Maio's third coach in only 14 matches, with the Figueira da Foz team eventually ranking last in the league; in early November he was appointed at the other side that had suffered top level relegation, Portimonense SC.

International career[edit]

During roughly ten years, Mozer played 32 times for Brazil. After missing the 1986 FIFA World Cup through injury, he was picked for the 1990 edition in Italy; he was booked in the first two group stage matches (both wins), and did not appear in the round-of-16 against Argentina, a 0–1 elimination.

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Flamengo
Benfica
Marseille
Kashima Antlers

Statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

Club performance League
Season Club League Apps Goals
Brazil League
1980 Flamengo Série A 0 0
1981 3 0
1982 17 1
1983 10 1
1984 18 3
1985 17 1
1986 24 2
Portugal League
1987/88 Benfica Primeira Liga 32 6
1988/89 29 2
France League
1989/90 Marseille Ligue 1 27 4
1990/91 31 0
1991/92 31 0
Portugal League
1992/93 Benfica Primeira Liga 13 0
1993/94 29 3
1994/95 17 0
Japan League
1995 Kashima Antlers J. League 1 15 0
1996 2 0
Country Brazil 89 8
Portugal 120 11
France 89 4
Japan 17 0
Total 315 23

International[edit]

Brazil national team
Year Apps Goals
1983 9 0
1984 3 0
1985 6 0
1986 5 0
1987 0 0
1988 0 0
1989 2 0
1990 4 0
1991 0 0
1992 1 0
1993 1 0
1994 1 0
Total 32 0

References[edit]

External links[edit]