Carlos Muñoz Cobo

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Carlos
Personal information
Full name Carlos Antonio Muñoz Cobo
Date of birth (1961-08-25) 25 August 1961 (age 52)
Place of birth Úbeda, Spain
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Striker
Youth career
Santa Eulalia
Juventud Hospitalet
Polvoretense
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1980–1983 Igualada
1983–1985 Barcelona B 29 (12)
1985–1988 Barcelona 0 (0)
1985 Elche (loan) 12 (5)
1985–1986 Hércules (loan) 20 (5)
1986–1987 Murcia (loan) 21 (4)
1987–1988 Oviedo (loan) 34 (25)
1988–1989 Atlético Madrid 21 (4)
1989–1996 Oviedo 240 (93)
1996–1998 Puebla 51 (33)
2000–2001 Lobos BUAP 52 (25)
Total 480 (206)
National team
1990–1991 Spain 6 (6)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Carlos Antonio Muñoz Cobo, known as simply Carlos (born 25 August 1961), is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a striker.

He represented five clubs in his professional career in his country, mainly Oviedo, moving to Mexico well into his 30's where he continued to score at an excellent rate. Over the course of 11 seasons, he amassed La Liga totals of 314 games and 111 goals.

Early years[edit]

Carlos was born in Úbeda, Andalusia. At the age of seven, he moved to Catalonia with his family for working purposes, beginning his career with local amateur clubs and making his senior debuts in Tercera División with CF Igualada.[1]

In 1981 Carlos moved to Cádiz for his military service, going on to spend one year out of football as local Cádiz CF tried to acquire him, being denied by Igualada.[1]

Club career[edit]

In 1983 Carlos signed for FC Barcelona, going on to appear almost exclusively for its reserves during his spell – he did compete with the main squad in the Copa de la Liga – and also being consecutively loaned to Elche CF, Hércules CF and Real Murcia, all in La Liga.[1] In the 1987–88 season, still owned by the Blaugrana, he joined Real Oviedo in Segunda División, with whom he achieved promotion (finished fourth, but Real Madrid Castilla was ineligible) while becoming the category's top scorer.

Carlos subsequently returned to Barcelona and, despite his wish to remain with Oviedo, was sold to Atlético Madrid where he could never settle, being barred in the capital outfit by the likes of Baltazar and Manolo.[1] He returned to the Asturians for the following campaign, proceeding to amass more than 100 overall goals for the side; in seven top level seasons, he only netted once in single digits and had 20 in 1993–94.

Subsequently, Carlos had an abroad spell with Mexico's Puebla FC, where he continued to display his scoring ability. In a 12 October 1996 match against Tecos UAG, he netted four times in a 5–2 success; he retired from football altogether after a few games with another side in the country and region, Lobos de la BUAP, at the age of 40.[2]

International career[edit]

For the Spanish national team Carlos played six times with as many goals, in a one-year span. His first game came on 12 September 1990 in a friendly match with Brazil in Gijón, and he scored after ten minutes in a 3–0 win.

After his stellar campaign with Oviedo, Carlos was overlooked by national boss Javier Clemente for his 1994 FIFA World Cup squad, even though he was the best national goal scorer in the season. The pair had had a run-in whilst at Atlético Madrid.[1]

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 12 September 1990 El Molinón, Gijón, Spain  Brazil 1–0 3–0 Friendly
2. 10 October 1990 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Iceland 2–0 2–1 Euro 1992 qualifying
3. 14 November 1990 Evžena Rošického, Prague, Czechoslovakia  Czechoslovakia 1–2 3–2 Euro 1992 qualifying
4. 19 December 1990 Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Albania 2–0 9–0 Euro 1992 qualifying
5. 19 December 1990 Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Albania 6–0 9–0 Euro 1992 qualifying
6. 27 March 1991 El Sardinero, Santander, Spain  Hungary 2–3 2–4 Friendly

Honours[edit]

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]