Carlos Rosales Mendoza

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This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Rosales and the second or maternal family name is Mendoza.
Carlos Rosales Mendoza
Carlos-rosales-mendoza.jpg
Born Carlos Alberto Rosales Mendoza
(1963-02-12)12 February 1963
La Unión, Guerrero, Mexico
Other names El Tísico, El Prieto, El Carlitos
Criminal charge
Drug trafficking, organized crime and use of illegal firearms
Criminal status
In prison

Carlos Alberto Rosales Mendoza (born 12 February 1963) is a former Mexican drug lord who founded and led an organized crime syndicate called La Familia Michoacana.[1] He was a close friend and associate of Osiel Cárdenas Guillén, the former leader of the Gulf Cartel.[2]

When Rosales Mendoza founded the first cells of La Familia Michoacana in the 1980s, the Milenio Cartel was competing with the organization for the control of the production and distribution of narcotics in the state of Michoacán.[3][4] In 2000, Rosales Mendoza united with the Gulf Cartel and Los Zetas to thwart the Milenio Cartel, causing a wave of violence in western Mexico that lasted until the year 2003.[4] He was arrested by the Grupo Aeromóvil de Fuerzas Especiales (GAFE) special forces squadron on 24 October 2004.[5]

Criminal career[edit]

Rosales Mendoza was born on 12 February 1963 in the municipality of La Unión, Guerrero in southern Mexico.[6]

Reports suggest that Rosales Mendoza's organization can be traced back to the 1980s[7] and that was possibly a vigilante group to counter corruption and local crime, but the organization eventually became involved in the production and distribution of narcotics throughout the Mexican state of Michoacán.[8][7] In the year 2000, Rosales Mendoza broke relations with Ar­man­do Va­len­cia Cor­ne­lio of the Milenio Cartel and founded his own organization in Michoacan called La Empresa ('The Business'), a criminal organization that was the direct predecessor of La Familia Michoacana, some sources state that La Empresa and La Familia Michoacana are essentially the same thing, mainly because they share the same members but not the same allies.[9] He also formed an alliance with Osiel Cárdenas Guillén, then leader of the Gulf Cartel and Los Zetas, and merged with his organization.[4] This alliance was intended to displace the Milenio Cartel from Michoacán state, and provoked a series of assassinations in area until the 2003.[7][10] With the alliance Rosales Mendoza became a Gulf Cartel operator and Cárdenas Guillén dispatched two lieutenants of Los Zetas, Efraín Teodoro Torres (Z-14) and Gustavo González Castro (The Erotic One), to help him to train his men and protect the drug trafficking corridors in Guerrero and in the port city of Lázaro Cárdenas.[3] He soon gained the trust of Cárdenas Guillén and became one of the leading lieutenants for the Gulf Cartel in western Mexico, where he commanded a training camp and taught over 50 gunmen military tactics and how to carry out prisons breaks to free Cárdenas Guillén, who had been captured and imprisoned in 2003.[11] After Rosales' arrest in 2004, Nazario Moreno González seized control of the gang and in 2006 [12] severed ties with the Gulf Cartel and Los Zetas in an effort to take control of Michoacán from any external influences, marking the birth of an independent La Familia Cartel and Starting a turf war against their former allies.[7][13][14][15]

Arrest[edit]

While preparing to liberate Osiel Cárdenas Guillén from prison, a squadron of about 150 soldiers in the Grupo Aeromóvil de Fuerzas Especiales (GAFE), the special forces unit of the Mexican Army, arrested Rosales Mendoza in capital city of Morelia, Michoacán on 24 October 2004.[5][16] His capture was a result of the collaborative effort between the Mexican Army and the PGR.[17]

Upon his arrest, Rosales Mendoza was taken under custody to Mexico City and kept in La Palma prison until he was taken to Puente Grande, a maximum security prison in the western state of Jalisco, on 28 October 2004.[5][18]

His capture resulted in new organizational leaders: José de Jesús Méndez Vargas and Nazario Moreno González.[19]

Release[edit]

On 22 May 2014, Rosales Mendoza was released from prison in Jalisco after fulfilling his ten-year sentence for illegal possession of firearms, organized crime, and drug trafficking.[20]

Kingpin Act sanction[edit]

On 24 March 2010, the United States Department of the Treasury sanctioned Rosales Mendoza under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (sometimes referred to simply as the "Kingpin Act"), for his involvement in drug trafficking along with fifty-three other international criminals and ten foreign entities.[21] The act prohibited U.S. citizens and companies from doing any king of business activity with him, and virtually froze all his assets in the U.S.[22]

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grayson, George W. (16 March 2009). "FPRI: La Familia: Another Deadly Mexican Syndicate". Council on Foreign Relations. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "FORMAL PRISIÓN EN CONTRA DE CARLOS ALBERTO ROSALES MENDOZA (A) "CARLITOS" Y DE ROBERTO HUERTA RÍOS" (in Spanish). Presidencia de la República. 2004. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Grayson, George W. (February 2009). "La Familia: Another Deadly Mexican Syndicate". Foreign Policy Research Institute. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c "Comenzó en la com­pra y ven­ta de gran­des can­ti­da­des de ma­ri­gua­na". Organización Editorial Mexicana (in Spanish). 22 June 2011. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c Olguín Sánchez, Jesús (25 October 2004). "Aprehenden a lugarteniente de Osiel Cárdenas". Presidencia de la República (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  6. ^ Money and Finance: Treasury: Treasury, PT. 500-End, Revised as of July 1, 2010. United States Government Printing Office. 28 September 2010. p. 764. ISBN 0160860032. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d "La Familia Michoacana Fact Sheet". Drug Enforcement Administration. October 2009. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  8. ^ Gibbs, Stephen (22 October 2009). "Family values of Mexico drug gang". BBC News. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  9. ^ http://www.oem.com.mx/laprensa/notas/n2118720.htm
  10. ^ "En Aguascalientes, la Policía Federal captura a Jesús Méndez Vargas, alias El Chango Mendez, lider de la organizacion delictiva "La Familia Michoacana" (in Spanish). Presidencia de la República. 22 June 2011. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  11. ^ Aranda, Jesús (26 October 2004). "Carlos Rosales planeaba la fuga de Osiel Cárdenas". La Jornada (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  12. ^ http://www.laht.com/article.asp?CategoryId=14091&ArticleId=339066
  13. ^ Grillo, Ioan (24 July 2009). "Mexico drug cartel with its own 'bible'". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  14. ^ "¿Cómo queda 'La Familia Michoacana' después de la captura de su líder?". CNNMéxico (in Spanish). 22 June 2011. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  15. ^ "Sólo jefes menores, los detenidos o muertos en días pasados en Michoacán: testigos protegidos". La Jornada (in Spanish). 17 December 2010. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  16. ^ "Ejército: Golpes al narco". Zeta (in Spanish). Choix Editores. 2007. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  17. ^ González, Iván (25 October 2004). "Rosales estaba ligado a Osiel Cárdenas: PGR". Esmas.com (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  18. ^ "Llega Carlos Rosales a Puente Grande". Esmas.com (in Spanish). 28 October 2004. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  19. ^ "Mexican Police Arrest La Familia Drug Cartel Bigwig". International Business Times. 22 June 2011. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  20. ^ "Líder de Zetas y Familia sale de la cárcel" (in Spanish). Unión Yucatán. 6 June 2014. Archived from the original on 8 June 2014. Retrieved 8 June 2014. 
  21. ^ "DESIGNATIONS PURSUANT TO THE FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN DESIGNATION ACT". United States Department of the Treasury. 15 May 2014. p. 11. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  22. ^ "An overview of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act". United States Department of the Treasury. 2009. p. 1. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 

Bibliography[edit]