Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Children's Video

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Andrew Carnegie Medal
Andrew Carnegie, three-quarter length portrait, seated, facing slightly left, 1913.jpg
Andrew Carnegie, who donated millions to libraries
Awarded for Best American video for children
Country United States
Presented by Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association
First awarded 1991
Official website ala.org/alsc/carnegie

The Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Children's Video was named in honor of nineteenth-century American philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.[1] It honors the producer of the most outstanding video production for children.[1] The Medal is supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and administered by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), through a Carnegie endowment.[1] In the past 19 years (1991-2009), 19 titles have been honored with the award.[2]

Criteria[edit]

  • The video must demonstrate excellence in the execution of the special techniques of the medium; in the visual interpretation of story, theme, or concept; in the use of sound; in the delineation of plot, theme, characters, mood setting, or information presented; in the acting, when appropriate; and in the appropriateness of technique or treatment to the story, theme, or concept.[3]
  • The video must demonstrate excellence of presentation for a child audience (age 0–14 years).
  • The video may be in cassette or DVD format.[3]
  • Only one Medal is presented, regardless of the number of producers involved in the video selected.[3]
  • The video must be distributed in the United States. Videos originally released in other countries are not eligible.[3]
  • The award is limited to producers who are citizens or residents of the United States.[3]
  • The video can be feature length, but not a theatrically released feature.[3]
  • The video can be based on another medium or made for another medium (e.g., television).[3]
  • Adaptations of material originally produced in other mediums should remain true to, expand, or complement the original work in some way.[3]
  • The video should be available for use in homes, public libraries, and with community organizations.[3]
  • The award is given only for work produced during the previous year, not for a body of work.[3]

Recipients[edit]

Winners of the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Children's Video[2]
Year Title Producers Studios Comments
2012 Children Make Terrible Pets Paul R. Gagne and Melissa Reilly Ellard Weston Woods Studios
2011 The Curious Garden Paul R. Gagne and Melissa Reilly Ellard Weston Woods Studios
2010 Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus Paul R. Gagne
Mo Willems
Weston Woods Studios The video is the story of a pigeon who wants to drive a bus.
2009 March On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed the World Paul R. Gagne
Melissa Reilly
Weston Woods Studios The video is Dr. Christine King Farris’ memory of the historic march on Washington.
2008 Jump In!: Freestyle Edition Kevin Lafferty
John Davis
Amy Palmer Robertson
Danielle Sterling
The Disney Channel This video tells the story of a young boxer who finds a passion for jumping rope.
2007 Knuffle Bunny Mo Willems Weston Woods Studios This video is based on the Caldecott Honor picture book.[2][4]
2006 The Man Who Walked Between the Towers Michael Sporn
Paul R. Gagne
Melissa Reilly
Michael Sporn Animation, Inc.
Weston Woods Studios
This video is based on the Caldecott Medal picture book about the acrobat who walked a tight rope between the two towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.[2][4]
2005 The Dot Paul R. Gagne
Melissa Reilly
Peter H. Reynolds
Karen Bresnahan
Gary Goldberger
Jonathan Meath
Weston Woods Studios
FableVision
This video is based on the picture book by Peter H. Reynolds in which a girl draws a dot and discovers the artist within.[2]
2004 Giggle, Giggle, Quack Paul R. Gagne
Melissa Reilly
Weston Woods Studios This video is based on the picture book by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin.[2]
2003 So You Want to Be President? Paul R. Gagne
Melissa Reilly
Weston Woods Studios This video is based on the Caldecott Medal book by Judith St. George and David Small.[2][4]
2002 My Louisiana Sky Dante Di Loreto
Anthony Edwards
Willard Carroll
Tom Wilhite
Weston Woods Studios
Hyperion Studio
This video is about a girl coming to terms with her mentally challenged parents.[2]
2001 Antarctic Antics Paul R. Gagne Weston Woods Studios This video is based on the book by Judy Sierra.[2]
2000 Miss Nelson Has a Field Day Paul R. Gagne Weston Woods Studios This video is based on the book by Harry Allard.[2]
1999 The First Christmas Frank Moynihan Xyzoo Animation This video uses clay animation and traditional Christmas music, colloquial dialogue and humor to tell the well-known story of the birth of Jesus.[2]
1998 Willa: An American Snow White Tom Davenport Davenport Films This video is based on the classic Grimm Tale reset in Virginia in 1915.[2]
1997 Notes Alive! On the Day You Were Born Tacy Mangan What a Gal Productions This video is based on the children's book by Debra Frasier.[2]
1996 Owen Paul R. Gagne Weston Woods This video is based on the Caldecott Honor book by Kevin Henkes about a boy who refuses to part with his blanket and a concerned neighbor who gives his parents advice.[2][4]
1995 Whitewash Michael Sporn Churchill Media This video tells the story of a young black girl's encounter with racism.[2]
1994 Eric Carle: Picture Writer Rawn Fulton Searchlight Films This video is a portrait of Eric Carle author and illustrator of several very popular picture books for children such as The Very Hungry Caterpillar.[2]
1993 The Pool Party John Kelly
Gary Soto
   
1992 Harry Comes Home Peter Matulavich Barr Films  
1991 Ralph S. Mouse George McQuilkin
John Matthews
Churchill Films This video is based on the book by Beverly Cleary about a mouse who rides a motorcycle and talks to boys.[2]

Recipients of Multiple Awards[edit]

  • Paul R. Gagne has received seven (7) Carnegie Medals (always while working for Weston Woods Studios).
  • Melissa Reilly has received five (5) Carnegie Medals (always while working with Paul R. Gagne at Weston Woods Studios).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]