Wheal Frances

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Wheal Frances
View from King Edward Mine - geograph.org.uk - 1592553.jpg
Wheal Frances is located in Cornwall
Wheal Frances
Wheal Frances
 Wheal Frances shown within Cornwall
OS grid reference SW786523
Civil parish Perranzabuloe
Unitary authority Cornwall
Ceremonial county Cornwall
Region South West
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town TRURO
Postcode district TR4
Dialling code 01872
Police Devon and Cornwall
Fire Cornwall
Ambulance South Western
EU Parliament South West England
UK Parliament Truro and Falmouth
List of places
UK
England
Cornwall

Coordinates: 50°19′46″N 5°06′43″W / 50.3295°N 5.1120°W / 50.3295; -5.1120

Wheal Frances is a village in Cornwall, England, UK. It is located in the civil parish of Perranzabuloe.

Geography[edit]

To the north is the hamlet of Carnkie, after which Carnkie Pond, a Site of Special Scientific Interest is named. This SSSI is noted for its biological interest, including 12 species of dragonfly.[1]

Wheal Frances Mine[edit]

The village was noted for the South Wheal Frances Mine of which many ruins remain.[2] Mining began in the local area in the early 1720s. After Lady Frances Bassett, the mineral Lord, offered a new lease on the land in 1834 it resumed production and experiences a golden period for ore production was the 1850s. By the early 20th century, several thousand men, women and children worked in the mine. [3]

A 75-inch cylinder pumping engine house with a was built at Marriott's shaft in 1847 and pumped water from Pascoe's shaft as well as Marriott's. In 1857 a 24-inch winder was installed in close proximity. Between 1896 and 1899 a major refurbishment of the shaft was undertaken, enabling mining to take places as far down as 6,000 feet.[3] Due to a slump in tin prices during World War I it ceased operations in 1918.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Carnkie Pond". Natural England. 1985. Retrieved 26 October 2011. 
  2. ^ Gamble, Barry (April 2011). Cornish Mines: St Just to Redruth. Alison Hodge Publishers. p. 69. ISBN 978-0-906720-81-3. Retrieved 8 October 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "Wheal Frances Mine". Cornwall Calling. Retrieved 8 October 2011.