Carol Dunlop

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Carol Dunlop
Carol Dunlop.jpg
Born April 2, 1946
Quincy, Massachusetts
Died November 2, 1982
Paris, France
Occupation Writer, Translator, Activist, Photographer
Notable work(s) Autonauts of the Cosmoroute (1983)
Spouse(s) Julio Cortázar

Carol Dunlop (April 2, 1946 – November 2, 1982) was a writer, translator, activist, and photographer. She is mostly known for being the wife of the Argentine writer Julio Cortázar with whom she co-wrote The Autonauts of the Cosmoroute (1982).

Biography[edit]

Born in Quincy, Massachusetts, she was the oldest of two daughters born to Daniel M. and Jean (Ayers) Dunlop. She married writer François Hebert, with whom she had one son, Stephane (b. 1968). The couple settled in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. In the 1970s Hebert and Dunlop divorced, and Dunlop eventually moved to Paris.

Dunlop met the writer and activist Julio Cortázar in Canada in 1977 and married him in 1981. She accompanied Cortázar on trips to a number of destinations, and sometimes traveled without him. Among the places she visited in the course of her political activism were Nicaragua and Poland; in the latter country she participated in a congress of solidarity with Chile. She died two years before Cortázar and is buried with him in the Cimetière de Montparnasse.

Cause of death[edit]

In her book Julio Cortázar, the Uruguayan writer Cristina Peri Rossi, who was a friend of Cortázar and Dunlop, stated that both died of AIDS. Peri Rossi maintained that Dunlop had sexually contracted AIDS from Cortázar, who had himself contracted the illness from a blood transfusion he received a few years earlier in the south of France. According to Cortázar biographer Miguel Herráez, however, Dunlop died of "bone marrow failure" ("aplasia medular") and Cortázar of leukemia.[1][2]

Notable works[edit]

  • Carol Dunlop, La solitude inachevée (1976).
  • Julio Cortázar, Carol Dunlop, Los autonautas de la cosmopista, (The Autonauts of the Cosmoroute) (1983).
  • Julio Cortázar, Carol Dunlop, Silvia Monrós-Stojaković, Correspondencia (2009), Alpha Decay, Barcelona.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pisani, Silvia (8 June 2001). "Afirman que Julio Cortázar murió de sida y no de leucemia" [They claim that Julio Cortázar died of AIDS and not leukemia]. La Nación (in Spanish). 
  2. ^ Herráez, Miguel. Julio Cortázar, Una Biografía Revisada. Alrevés, 2011 ISBN 9788415098034 pp. 314, 333

External links[edit]