Carol Eckman Award

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Carol Eckman Award
Awarded for coach who best demonstrates the character of the late Carol Eckman
Country United States
Presented by Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA)
First awarded 1986
Currently held by Jane Albright, University of Nevada, Reno
Official website Official site

The Carol Eckman Award is an award given annually since 1986 to the women's college basketball active coach who "best demonstrates the character of the late Carol Eckman, the mother of the collegiate women's basketball national championship". Given by the Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA), the award is named for former women's head coach Carol Eckman, a head coach best known for establishing the first National Invitational Women's Intercollegiate Basketball Tournament in 1969.[1]

Eckman, who served as head coach at West Chester State College, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and Lock Haven State College, started the national tournament while at West Chester State College. She started the sixteen team tournament in 1969. Eckman invited 15 teams to the West Chester campus, charging each $25 to cover officials and awards.[2] This tournament served as a springboard for the formation of the AIAW two years later, which administered national championships for many sports, including basketball, from 1971 until 1982, when the NCAA became involved in women's sports.[3][4]

The criteria for the award include:[5]

  • Sportsmanship
  • Commitment to the student-athlete
  • Honesty
  • Ethical behavior
  • Courage

Winners[edit]

Susan Sommers, 1999 Award Winner
Sue Ramsey, 2012 Award winner
Year Coach School Reference
1986 Laura Mapp Bridgewater College [6]
1987 Jody Conradt University of Texas [7]
1988 Kay Yow North Carolina State University [8]
1989 Linda Hill-MacDonald University of Minnesota [9]
1990 Dr. Maryalice Jeremiah California State University, Fullerton [10]
1991 Marian Washington University of Kansas [11]
1992 Jill Hutchinson Illinois State University [12]
1993 C. Vivian Stringer University of Iowa [13]
1994 Sue Gunter Louisiana State University [14]
1995 Ceal Barry University of Colorado [15]
1996 Joann Rutherford University of Missouri
1997 Amy Ruley North Dakota State University [16]
1998 Kay James University of Southern Mississippi [17]
1999 Susan Summons Miami-Dade Community College [18]
2000 Kathy Delaney-Smith Harvard University [19]
2001 Juliene B. Simpson East Stroudsburg University
2002 Barbara Stevens Bentley College [20]
2003 Marsha Sharp Texas Tech University [21]
2004 Deirdre Kane West Chester University [22]
2005 Bonnie Henrickson University of Kansas [23]
2006 Gail Goestenkors Duke University [24]
2007 Theresa Grentz University of Illinois [25]
2008 Doug Bruno DePaul University [26]
2009 Muffet McGraw University of Notre Dame [27]
2010 Kevin Cook Gallaudet University [28]
2011 Joanne Boyle University of California, Berkeley [29]
2012 Sue Ramsey Ashland University [30]
2013 Jan Ross University of Oklahoma [31]
2014 Jane Albright University of Nevada, Reno [32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ernestine G. Miller (29 May 2002). Making her mark: firsts and milestones in women's sports. McGraw-Hill Professional. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-07-139053-8. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  2. ^ VanDerveer, p. 73
  3. ^ Robert Ikard (July 2008). Just for Fun: The Story of AAU Women's Basketball. University of Arkansas Press. p. 161. ISBN 978-1-55728-889-9. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  4. ^ Nancy Lieberman-Cline; Robin Roberts; Kevin Warneke (1996). Basketball for women: becoming a complete player. Human Kinetics. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-87322-610-3. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  5. ^ "Carol Eckman Award". WBCA. Retrieved 1 Jul 2014. 
  6. ^ "Laura Mapp". Virginia Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  7. ^ "Head Coach Jody Conradt". Texas Longhorns Women's Basketball. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  8. ^ "Kay Yow through the years". The News & Observer Publishing Company. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  9. ^ "Hill-MacDonald Named Women's Basketball Coach At Buffalo". Mid-American Conference. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  10. ^ "Dr. Maryalyce Jeremiah". Cal State Fullerton. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  11. ^ "Marian Washington timeline". The World Company. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  12. ^ "Jill Hutchison". WBHOF. 
  13. ^ "C. Vivian Stringer". The State University of New Jersey. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  14. ^ Robert Ikard (July 2008). Just for Fun: The Story of AAU Women's Basketball. University of Arkansas Press. p. 170. ISBN 978-1-55728-889-9. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  15. ^ "Ceal Barry". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  16. ^ "Amy Ruley". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  17. ^ "Athletic Department To Honor Former Coach Kay James". Southern Miss.com. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  18. ^ "Susan Summons". Black Speakers.com. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  19. ^ "Kathy Delaney-Smith". Harvard University. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  20. ^ "Barbara Stevens". Bentley University. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  21. ^ "Sharp receives Eckman Award". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  22. ^ "Deirdre Kane". West Chester University. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  23. ^ "Henrickson To Receive Carol Eckman Award". University of Kansas Athletic Department. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  24. ^ "Goestenkors wins Carol Eckman award". ESPN. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  25. ^ "Grentz garners WBCA's Carol Eckman Award". Illinois homepage.net. Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  26. ^ "DePaul's Doug Bruno Honored with WBCA's Carol Eckman Award". DePaul University. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  27. ^ "Muffet McGraw Accepts WBCA Carol Eckman Award". The Official Site of University of Notre Dame Athletics. Retrieved 2 October 2011. 
  28. ^ "Gallaudet's Kevin Cook honored with WBCA's Carol Eckman Award". Gallaudet University. 
  29. ^ "Joanne Boyle Honored with 2011 Carol Eckman Award". California Golden Bears. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  30. ^ "Ashland University’s Sue Ramsey is Carol Eckman Award winner". SportsPageMagazine.com. March 7, 2012. Retrieved 6 April 2012. 
  31. ^ Kersey, Jason (April 18, 2013). "Oklahoma women’s basketball assistant Jan Ross wins 2013 Carol Eckman Award". NewsOK.com. Retrieved 9 Apr 2014. 
  32. ^ "WBCA honors University of Nevada's Jane Albright with Carol Eckman Award". WBCA.org. Mar 17, 2014. Retrieved 1 Jul 2014. 

Sources[edit]

  • VanDerveer, Tara (1998). Shooting from the outside : how a coach and her Olympic team transformed women's basketball. New York: Avon Books. ISBN 0380794985. 

External links[edit]

  • Carol Eckman Award webpage. Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) official website