Carol Hudkins

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Carol Hudkins
Member of the Nebraska Legislature
from the 21st district
In office
1997–2009
Succeeded by Ken Haar
Personal details
Born (1945-02-21) February 21, 1945 (age 70)
Political party Republican[1]
Residence Malcolm, Nebraska

Carol L. Hudkins (born February 21, 1945[1]) is a politician from the U.S. state of Nebraska. She served in the Nebraska Legislature for four terms, covering sixteen years.

Early life and career[edit]

Hudkins was born in North Platte, Nebraska. She graduated from high school in Waverly, then attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She married Larry Hudkins in 1964; the couple farmed near Malcolm, and Hudkins worked as a medical transcriptionist. She was elected to the Malcolm school board, and served as its chair.[1][2]

Legislative elections[edit]

In 1992, Hudkins ran for the Nebraska Legislature from District 21, which then consisted of parts of Lancaster, Saunders, and Sarpy Counties.[3] In the nonpartisan primary election, she placed first of five candidates, with 31.7% of the vote to Bill Sapp's 28.3%.[4] As the top two vote-getters, she and Sapp moved on to the general election, which Hudkins won with 57% of the vote to Sapp's 43%.[5]

In 1996, Hudkins defended her seat from a challenge by Carol Yoakum and Dale McClure, both of Lincoln.[6] In the primary, Hudkins took 59.3% of the vote; Yoakum, 27.3%; and McClure, 13.4%.[7] In the general election, Hudkins received 64.3% of the vote to Yoakum's 35.4%.[8]

Hudkins ran unopposed for re-election to her seat in the legislature in 2000, and again in 2004.[9][10]

In 2000, Nebraska voters passed a term-limits amendment to the state's constitution, under which state legislators could serve no more than two terms consecutively.[11][12] This rendered Hudkins ineligible to run for re-election in 2008, in which year she announced her retirement.[2]

Legislative career[edit]

During her tenure in the Legislature, Hudkins served on the Rules Committee, of which she was chairperson; the Natural Resources Committee, of which she was vice-chairperson; the Judiciary Committee, of which she was vice-chairperson; the Agriculture Committee; the General Affairs Committee; the Transportation and Telecommunications Committee; and the Executive Board.[1][13][14][15]

In the Legislature, Hudkins proposed a bill to license and regulate accupuncturists so that they could practice in Nebraska; the measure passed in 2001.[2][16]

Hudkins also sponsored legislation to lower the legal blood-alcohol level for drivers from 0.10% to 0.08%. Recently passed federal legislation that withheld highway funds from states that failed to adopt the lower limit played a role in the passage of the measure.[2][17][18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Nebraska Blue Book 1992–1993, p. 269. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  2. ^ a b c d Hicks, Nancy. "Hudkins reflects on time in Legislature". Lincoln Journal Star. 2008-04-11. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  3. ^ Nebraska Blue Book 1992-1993, pp. 296–7. Nebraska Access. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  4. ^ "Official Report of the Board of State Canvassers of the State of Nebraska: Primary Election, Held May 12, 1992" , p. 25. Canvass books from 1916 to 1998 available for download via "Previous Elections", Nebraska Secretary of State. Downloaded 2015-02-28.
  5. ^ "Official Report of the Board of State Canvassers of the State of Nebraska: General Election, Held November 3, 1992" , p. 11. Canvass books from 1916 to 1998 available for download via "Previous Elections", Nebraska Secretary of State. Downloaded 2015-02-28.
  6. ^ "Ben Nelson Unchallenged". McCook Daily Gazette. 1996-03-02, p. 1. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  7. ^ "Official Report of the Board of State Canvassers of the State of Nebraska: Primary Election, May 14, 1996" , p. 14 of PDF file (pages not numbered in document). Canvass books from 1916 to 1998 available for download via "Previous Elections", Nebraska Secretary of State. Downloaded 2015-02-28.
  8. ^ "Official Report of the Board of State Canvassers of the State of Nebraska: General Election, November 5, 1996" , p. 10 of PDF file (pages not numbered in document). Canvass books from 1916 to 1998 available for download via "Previous Elections", Nebraska Secretary of State. Downloaded 2015-02-28.
  9. ^ "Legislative incumbents running unopposed in general election". Grand Island Independent. 2000-11-02. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  10. ^ "Election 2004: Local senators unopposed". Lincoln Journal Star. 2004-10-21. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  11. ^ Stoddard, Martha. "17 senators in Nebraska Legislature hit their (term) limits". Omaha World-Herald. 2014-04-19. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  12. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions About Senators". Nebraska Legislature. Retrieved 2015-02-28. Archived 2014-07-01 at Wayback Machine.
  13. ^ Nebraska Blue Book 2006–2007, p. 307. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  14. ^ Nebraska Blue Book 1994–1995, p. 261. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  15. ^ Nebraska Blue Book 1998–1999, p. 315. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  16. ^ "Accupuncture Law Passes in Nebraska". Accupuncture Today. August 2001. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  17. ^ "Federal aid riding on blood-alcohol limit". Grand Island Independent. 2001-01-23. Retrieved 2015-02-28.
  18. ^ Tietgen, Gwen. "Legislature passes bill for lower alcohol limit". Daily Nebraskan. 2001-02-28. Retrieved 2015-02-28.