Carol Kreeger Davidson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Carol Kreeger Davidson
Birth name Carol Kreeger
Born Chicago, Illinois
Spouse Donald Davidson
Nationality American
Field Sculpture
Training B.F.A. (1967) at University of Hartford Art School; M.F.A. (1974) at Rhode Island School of Design
Movement Postminimalism

Carol Kreeger Davidson is an American sculptor known for her Postminimalist style and technique of bending, folding, and bolting material rather than welding.

Life[edit]

Carol Kreeger was born in Chicago, Illinois and attended the University of Chicago before transferring her credits to Northwestern University where she graduated with a B.A. in literature. She moved to Hartford, Connecticut after marrying Donald Davidson. In 1959 she decided to study art and began to study sculpture privately with Wolfgang Behl before completing her B.F.A. cum laude, with honors in sculpture, from University of Hartford Art School in 1967. In 1974 she completed her M.F.A. from Rhode Island School of Design.

Art and career[edit]

Kreeger Davidson's primarily worked with paper and bronze in her sculpture. She is also known for her painted sculptures made between 1985 and 1988. Kreeger Davidson was represented by Betty Parsons Gallery and Humphrey Fine Art and Design. Her one person shows include Hudson River Museum, Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Reading Public Museum, National Museum of Women in the Arts, and the New Britain Museum of American Art. She has been a lecturer at Rhode Island School of Design, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and Northwestern University. In 1984 she was named the first Distinguished Alumna of the University of Hartford Art School and received a ten-year retrospective exhibition at the university's Joseloff Gallery.[1]

She is the recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Asia Foundation, and the Commissions for the Arts of both Connecticut and New York. She lives and works in West Hartford, Connecticut.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Abstract Figure: Carol Kreeger Davidson, a Retrospective. Reading Public Museum, 2002, p. 137.