Carole Shorenstein Hays

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Carole Shorenstein Hays (born 15 September 1948 as Carole J. Shorenstein) is an American theatrical producer.

Biography[edit]

Shorenstein was one of three children born to real estate developer Walter Shorenstein[1] and Phyllis Finley.[2] Her father was Jewish and her mother converted to Judaism.[3] She has two siblings: CBS producer Joan Shorenstein (who died of cancer in 1985) and real estate investor Douglas W. Shorenstein, the chairman of the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (his term runs from 2011 to 2014). She lives in Sea Cliff, San Francisco, California with her husband Jeff Hays. They have two children, Wally and Gracie.[4] She was appointed to the National Park Foundation Board of Directors in 2009.

She is the owner of The Curran Theatre in San Francisco.

Career[edit]

Shorenstein attended New York University but did not graduate. She worked at United Artists as a movie publicist for the film Live and Let Die. Later she joined her father's long time friend, James M. Nederlander as a business partner[4] and established herself as a respected producer of critically acclaimed and financially successful works. She owns the Curran Theatre and serves as President of SHN, a theatrical producing company in San Francisco.[1] Several of the plays she produced have received Tony Awards, including a revival of Fences in 2010 [2].

She has produced many award-winning Broadway plays. In addition to her Broadway endeavors, she is the President of SHN (Theatres), a theatrical producing company in San Francisco. She is the only Broadway producer to win the Tony Awards as producer for two different productions of the same play—August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize winning Fences, winning Best Play for the original production in 1987 starring James Earl Jones, and Best Revival for the 2010 run starring Denzel Washington. She served as lead producer of the Broadway production of John Patrick Shanley's Doubt, which won the 2005 Tony Award for Best Play and The Pulitzer Prize. Carole also co-produced the Broadway production of Julius Caesar starring Denzel Washington. She has produced these additional Tony Award-winning plays on Broadway: Richard Greenberg's Take Me Out, Edward Albee's The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia, and Pulitzer Prize winner Proof by David Auburn. Other Broadway productions include Tony Kushner's Caroline, or Change, Suzan-Lori Parks's 2002 Pulitzer Prize-winning Topdog/Underdog, Charles Busch's The Tale of the Allergist's Wife, Patrick Marber's Closer, David Mamet's The Old Neighborhood, the Royal Court/Théâtre de Complicité production of Eugène Ionesco's The Chairs, and the RSC production of A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Productions[edit]

Play Location Premiere Finale
The Grand Tour Palace Theatre January 11, 1979 March 4, 1979
Woman of the Year Palace Theatre March 29, 1981 March 13, 1983
Can-Can Minskoff Theatre April 30, 1981 May 3, 1981
Oliver! Mark Hellinger Theatre April 29, 1984 May 13, 1984
Fences 46th Street Theatre March 26, 1987 June 26, 1988
A Midsummer Night's Dream Lunt-Fontanne Theatre March 31, 1996 May 26, 1996
The Old Neighborhood Booth Theatre November 19, 1997 May 10, 1998
The Chairs John Golden Theatre April 1, 1998 June 13, 1998
Not About Nightingales Circle in the Square Theatre February 25, 1999 June 13, 1999
Closer Music Box Theatre March 25, 1999 August 22, 1999
Proof Walter Kerr Theatre October 24, 2000 January 5, 2003
The Tale of the Allergist's Wife Ethel Barrymore Theatre November 2, 2000 September 15, 2002
The Goat, or, Who is Sylvia? John Golden Theatre March 10, 2002 December 15, 2002
Topdog/Underdog Ambassador Theatre April 7, 2002 August 11, 2002
Take Me Out Walter Kerr Theatre February 27, 2003 January 4, 2004
Caroline, or Change Eugene O'Neill Theatre May 2, 2004 August 29, 2004
Gem of the Ocean Walter Kerr Theatre December 6, 2004 February 6, 2005
Doubt Walter Kerr Theatre March 31, 2005 July 2, 2006
Julius Caesar Belasco Theatre April 3, 2005 June 12, 2005
Well Longacre Theatre March 30, 2006 May 14, 2006

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Selna (2010-06-24). "Street-smart developer shaped S.F. skyline". San Francisco Chronicle. 
  2. ^ New York Times: "Phyllis Shorenstein, 76, Patron Of Asian Arts in San Francisco" By KATHLEEN TELTSCH June 24, 1994
  3. ^ San Francisco Gate: "Second Acts / San Francisco's Carole Shorenstein Hays has built a career on Broadway by taking calculated risks" by Steven Winn October 31, 2004
  4. ^ a b Winn, Steven (2004-10-31). "Second Acts: San Francisco's Carole Shorenstein Hays has built a career on Broadway by taking calculated risks". San Francisco Chronicle. 

External links[edit]