Carolina Challenge Cup

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Carolina Challenge Cup
2013 CCC Logo.jpeg
Founded 2004
Region United States
South Carolina (host)
Number of teams 4
Current champions D.C. United (4th title)
Most successful club(s) D.C. United (4 titles)
Website Official website
2014 Carolina Challenge Cup

The Carolina Challenge Cup is a four-team round robin pre-season competition hosted by the Charleston Battery. It was started in 2004 and features teams from Major League Soccer and the United Soccer Leagues.[1] The Columbus Crew edged out D.C. United on goal differential to win the 2004 competition, while the San Jose Earthquakes won the 2005 competition. San Jose's second iteration (although a separate team), the Houston Dynamo, won the 2006 and 2007 versions.[2] The San Jose Earthquakes again won the tournament on their return to the MLS in 2008 while Real Salt Lake claimed the title in their debut in 2009.

Over the first few years of the tournament, the champion had gone on to win one of the two year-end MLS trophies, the Supporters' Shield or MLS Cup. This streak ended in 2008 as San Jose Earthquakes failed to make the playoffs, consequently missing out on both titles. Since 2008 it has either predicted the MLS Cup winner or the team with the worst record in the league. San Jose and D.C United had the worst records in 2008 and 2010 respectively, while Real Salt Lake won the 2009 MLS Cup.

Format[edit]

The tournament has always featured four clubs in a round-robin format, with each club playing three games over the span of a week.

History[edit]

Coffee Pot Cup[edit]

A highlight of the competitions that have been held so far is the Coffee Pot Cup, a game between D.C. United and the host Charleston Battery, making it a rare example of an MLS-USL team rivalry. The history behind this comes from a postgame incident after the Third Round of the 1999 U.S. Open Cup, where Charleston pulled a shocking 4-3 extra time upset at home over D.C. A news report from then:

"D.C. United apparently used the visitors' locker room to vent its frustration over losing to the Charleston Battery in last Wednesday's US Open Cup match at Blackbaud Stadium here. Members of the Major League Soccer team smashed two coffee pots and pulled off some showerheads, according to Battery officials. 'I think a bill will be sent to them,' Battery general manager Buckley Andrews said earlier this week. The US Soccer Federation website's match report on Charleston's 4-3 overtime win over the two-time MLS champion called it 'one of the biggest upsets ever seen in American soccer history ... It will surely go down as an Open Cup classic.'"[citation needed]

After a few years, supporters of both sides in the name of spirited competition decided to have an actual Coffee Pot played for between the sides as a friendly wager. The winner has the other team's supporters fill the Cup with beer for the winning team's supporters to enjoy. Supporters of both sides say that whenever the two sides play, they are playing for the Coffee Pot Cup (the two sides could meet in the U.S. Open Cup if drawn together, or in an arranged friendly). The inaugural winners of the Cup in 2004 were D.C. United after winning 2-1. In 2005 and 2006, the two teams played to a tie (2-2, 1-1), meaning no one had to pay for the beer to fill the Cup, but D.C. maintained possession.

Mainly due to their commitment to play in the CONCACAF Champions League, D.C. United were unable to play in the 2007 and 2008 versions of the tournament.

Most recently the teams competed in the final of the 2008 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup, as D.C. United defeated Charleston 2-1 on September 3, 2008 at RFK Stadium.

  • 2004, Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 1
  • 2005, Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 2
  • 2006, Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 1, Charleston Battery 1
  • 2006, Cary, NC Friendly: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 0
  • 2008, US Open Cup: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 1
  • 2009, Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 0
  • 2010, Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 0
  • 2011. Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 1
  • 2012. Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 3, Charleston Battery 1
  • 2014. Carolina Challenge Cup: D.C. United 1, Charleston Battery 1

Past tournament champions[edit]

Year 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place 4th Place
2004 United States Columbus Crew United States D.C. United United States Charleston Battery United States Wilmington Hammerheads
2005 United States San Jose Earthquakes United States D.C. United United States Columbus Crew United States Charleston Battery
2006 United States Houston Dynamo United States D.C. United United States Charleston Battery United States New York Red Bulls
2007 United States Houston Dynamo Canada Toronto FC United States New York Red Bulls United States Charleston Battery
2008 United States San Jose Earthquakes United States Charleston Battery United States New York Red Bulls Canada Toronto FC
2009 United States Real Salt Lake Canada Toronto FC United States D.C. United United States Charleston Battery
2010 United States D.C. United United States Real Salt Lake Canada Toronto FC United States Charleston Battery
2011 United States D.C. United United States Charleston Battery United States Chicago Fire Canada Toronto FC
2012 United States D.C. United United States Chicago Fire United States Columbus Crew United States Charleston Battery
2013 United States Chicago Fire Canada Vancouver Whitecaps FC United States Charleston Battery United States Houston Dynamo
2014 United States D.C. United United States Seattle Sounders FC United States Houston Dynamo United States Charleston Battery

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Carolina Challenge Cup Schedule Set". Charleston Battery Communications. CharlestonBattery.com. November 16, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2012. 
  2. ^ "DC United, Toronto FC & Real Salt Lake join Charleston Battery for 2009 Carolina Challenge Cup". CharlestonBattery.com. January 20, 2009. Retrieved February 10, 2012. 

External links[edit]