Caroline Steffen

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Caroline Steffen
Caroline Steffen Ironman 70.3 Austria 2012a.jpg
Caroline Steffen competing in 2012 at Ironman 70.3 Austria
Personal information
Nickname(s) Xena
Born (1978-09-18) September 18, 1978 (age 35)[1]
Spiez, Switzerland[2]
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Weight 68 kg (150 lb)
Sport
Country Switzerland
Turned pro 2009
Coached by Chris McCormack

Caroline Steffen (born 18 September 1978) is a professional triathlete from Switzerland. She is the winner of the 2010 and 2012 ITU Long Distance Triathlon World Championships and took second at the 2010 and 2012 Ironman World Championship.[3][4] Before competing as a professional triathlete she was a member of the Lifeforce Pro Cycling Team.[1]

Career[edit]

Steffen was born in Spiez and began her early competitive career as a swimmer. She enjoyed success as a swimmer competing on the Swiss junior and senior national teams and winning multiple national titles. In 2002, Steffen underwent shoulder surgery and would eventually retire from competitive swimming afterwards.[2] After taking some time off Steffen competed in a two-day Swiss multisport competition, the Gigathlon, which reignited her desire to compete and train again. In 2006, after having completed a few Olympic distance triathlons she entered and placed second in her age group at Ironman Switzerland, posting a sub-10 hour time. She went on to compete at the 2006 Ironman World Championships in Hawai'i where she posted another sub-10 hour time and place third in her age group as an amateur.[2]

Cycling[edit]

Steffen moved on to concentrate on bicycle racing as she was not enjoying the swim training and felt that her running was a competitive weakness. Soon she was invited to join the Raleigh Lifeforce professional team alongside Nicole Cooke and Karin Thürig. After it was determined that she was too big to be a climber and not fast enough to be a sprinter, her role on the team was to set the sprinters up for the finish of races. As a professional cyclist she was showing improvement but the sport was not providing her with satisfaction. In May 2008, Steffen decided to leave the team and try her luck as a pro triathlete.[2]

Triathlon[edit]

Soon after, Steffen was competing in Ironman competitions again. She moved to Australia and eventually quit her job to focus on triathlon training in Mooloolaba on the Sunshine Coast. Steffen began enjoying successes at the 70.3 and Ironman distances which caused her to gain the attention of coach Brett Sutton who eventually invited her to join team TBB and earning the nickname "Xena the Warrior Princess" or simply "Xena."[2][5] In 2009, Steffen took fourth place the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Clearwater, Florida. A few months later she won her first major race, the Ironman 70.3 in Geelong in February 2010. She highlighted 2010 with a win at the ITU Long Distance Triathlon World Championships[6] and a second place at the Ironman World Championships.[7] In October 2012, she placed 2nd in the 2012 Ironman World Championship at Kona, Hawaii being narrowly passed by eventual winner Leanda Cave approx. 3 miles from the finish line.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Caroline Steffen". CyclingArchives.com. Retrieved 16 June 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Caroline Steffen: How Good Is She?". Competitor Group, Inc. 22 April 2011. Retrieved 17 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "Female Pro Athlete - Caroline Steffen". team TBB. Retrieved 16 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "McCormack, Steffen Take ITU Long Distance Worlds Championships". Triathlete.com. 29 July 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012. 
  5. ^ "Who is Xena aka Caroline Steffen Interview: Team TBB with Brett Sutton". teamTBB. 12 August 2010. Retrieved 17 June 2011. 
  6. ^ "Sudrie, Steffen Take ITU Long Distance World Titles". International Triathlon Union. 1 August 2010. Retrieved 17 June 2011. 
  7. ^ Carlson, Timothy (9 October 2010). "Aussies Rule at Kona". Slowtwitch.com. Retrieved 17 June 2011. 
  8. ^ Hichens, Liz (13 October 2012). "Jacobs, Cave Win 2012 Ironman World Championship". Triathlon.com. Retrieved 29 October 2012. 

External links[edit]