Caroline Vout

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Caroline Vout
Born Durham, United Kingdom
Nationality British
Alma mater University of Cambridge
Occupation Academic

Caroline Vout is a British academic, classicist, and art historian. She is currently a Reader in Classics at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Christ's College.

Career[edit]

Vout was born in Durham.[1] She studied at Newnham College, Cambridge in 1991, where she read Classics. After Cambridge, she studied for a Master's in Roman and Byzantine Art at the Courtauld Institute,[2] before returning to Cambridge for her doctorate, which was supervised by Keith Hopkins and Mary Beard. Upon finishing her doctorate, she lectured at the Universities of Bristol and Nottingham until being appointed to her current position in 2006.[3] She curated at exhibition on Antinous at the Moore Institute in Leeds and is on the academic advisory panel for the department of Greek and Roman antiquities at the Fitzwilliam Museum.[4] She has written for The Times Literary Supplement and The Guardian,[5] and appeared on the 2011 BBC Four documentary Fig Leaf: The Biggest Cover-Up In History and on BBC Radio 4's In Our Time.

Books[edit]

  • Antinous: the Face of the Antique. Leeds: Henry Moore Sculpture Trust, 2006.
  • Power and Eroticism in Imperial Rome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
  • The Hills of Rome: Signature of an Eternal City. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012
  • Sex on Show: Seeing the Erotic in Greece and Rome. London: British Museum Press, 2013
  • Epic Visions: Visuality in Greek and Latin Epic and its Reception. (co-edited with Helen Lovet). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Awards[edit]

External links[edit]

  1. ^ Vout 2012: 1
  2. ^ From the 'About the author' blurb, Vout: 2006
  3. ^ http://www.christs.cam.ac.uk/college-life/people/academic-staff/fellow_voutc/
  4. ^ http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/dept/ant/greeceandrome/display/whoswho.html
  5. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/carrie-vout
  6. ^ http://arthistorynewsletter.com/blog/?p=662