Carriglea Park

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Carriglea Park was an industrial school in Dún Laoghaire, Ireland.[1] The Christian Brothers purchased the property in 1893.[2] It was first certified as an Industrial School in 1894 and started operating in 1896.[3] It was located in Kill O'The Grange in south County Dublin, at the junction of Kill Avenue and Rochestown Avenue.[4] The site is now the location of the Quadrangle Building in Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology, a third level institute of technology with over 2000 students.


History[edit]

The property originally consisted of the 'Ruby Hall' mansion and 40 acres of land, which was increased to 60 acres (240,000 m2) by the purchase of a nearby farm.[5] In 1946 purchase of land intended for a secondary school increased the size of the property to 115 acres (0.47 km2).[5]

The idea behind establishing Carriglea was that it would be "Artane on a small scale".[2]

The mansion was used as residence for the Christian Brothers and a separate building was built for the dormitory, dining room, kitchen and classrooms.[6]

Closure[edit]

The school officially closed on 30 June 1954.[7]

When the Congregation decided to close Carriglea Park, it decided that admissions to St Joseph's Industrial School, Letterfrack would be restricted to those boys whose offences would have resulted in a prison sentence for an adult.[8] This was strongly opposed by the Department of Education and Skills, Department of Justice and members of the judiciary, but the Brothers were adamant and went ahead with the plan.[8]

The Dún Laoghaire College of Art and Design moved to the site in the early 1980s, expanding into the Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology (IADT) in 1997 with several more buildings constructed over the years.

Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse[edit]

Physical abuse[edit]

See also: Physical abuse

The Commission concluded that when discipline had broken down, the Congregation approved the appointment of a man known to practice excessive corporal punishment and that they considered this an appropriate approach.[9]

Sexual abuse[edit]

The Commission concluded that there was a problem with abuse of boys by other boys.[10] They noted that a Brother had been transferred from Artane Industrial school to Carriglea after concerns had been expressed about his friendship with a particular boy in Artane - this was condemned as "ill-judged and dangerous".[10]

Two specific Brothers were noted as having histories of abuse - they were given the pseudonyms Brother Tristan and Brother Lancelin.[11][12]

Brother Tristan was probably known to be an abuser by the General Council, but was moved on and kept employed in the insdustrial school system.[11] He had committed offences at Carriglea and Marino.[11] The Commission found that the records of the General Council showed that they regarded his offences as being much more serious than the submission to the Commission by the Christian Brothers had indicated.[11]

Brother Lancelins offences were serious enough to be described with language that would be used of criminal offences, contradicting the submission made by the Congregation to the Commission.[12] The Commission described one offence in particular as a "serious case of sexual abuse".[12] Unusually for the 1940s, the boys made written statements about the abuse.[12]

Emotional abuse and neglect[edit]

See also: Emotional abuse and Neglect

Carriglea Park was "dilapidated and run-down" for most of the period of the Commissions remit.[13]

Boys were badly clothed and went barefoot in summer despite adequate funds being available.[13]

Education and trades[edit]

Primary school education at Carriglea appears to have been of a relatively high standard.[14]

The Commission praised the practice of preparing boys for the Postal Office exam, but regretted that the practice of sending brighter boys to the Christian Brothers secondary school in Dun Laoghaire was discontinued.[14]

Trades were for the benefit of the institution, not the boys and only two were offered apart from farming.[15]

Boys in Carriglea were not provided with work skills for after their time in the school.[15]

General conclusions[edit]

The Congregation had adequate funds to provide reasonable care for the boys sent to Carriglea, but didn't do so.[16] The Congregation made considerable profit from closing Carriglea Park but did not use it to benefit boys.[16]

Chronic mismanagement and a harsh regieme caused abuse.[16]

Discipline was enforced by harsh and violent means to introduce order, with no regard for the boys welfare.[16]

Sexual abuse by two Brothers was noted.[16]

Primary education was good, but trades preparation was poor.[16]

The school was dilapidated and poorly run.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, Chapter 10, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  2. ^ a b Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-3, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  3. ^ Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-1, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  4. ^ Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-4, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  5. ^ a b Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-5, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  6. ^ Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-6, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  7. ^ Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-13, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  8. ^ a b Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-15, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  9. ^ Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-90, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  10. ^ a b Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-110, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  11. ^ a b c d Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-98, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  12. ^ a b c d Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-100, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  13. ^ a b Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-140, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  14. ^ a b Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-171, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  15. ^ a b Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-184, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse
  16. ^ a b c d e f Chapter 10, Carriglea Park Industrial School, Dun Laoghaire (‘Carriglea’), 1894–1954, section 10-200, Report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse