Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site

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Carter G. Woodson House
Carter G. Woodson House
Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site is located in Washington, D.C.
Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site
Location 1538 9th St., NW, Washington, D.C.
Coordinates 38°54′36″N 77°1′27″W / 38.91000°N 77.02417°W / 38.91000; -77.02417Coordinates: 38°54′36″N 77°1′27″W / 38.91000°N 77.02417°W / 38.91000; -77.02417
Built 1915
Architect Unknown
Architectural style Late Victorian
Governing body National Park Service
NRHP Reference # 76002135
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 11, 1976[1]
Designated NHL May 11, 1976[2]
Designated NHS February 27, 2006

Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site at 1538 9th Street, NW, in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C., preserves the home of Carter G. Woodson (1875–1950). Woodson, the founder of Black History Month, was an African-American historian, author, and journalist.

History[edit]

The property served as Dr. Woodson's home from 1915 until his death in 1950. From this three-story Victorian rowhouse, Woodson managed the operations of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, published the Negro History Bulletin and the Journal of Negro History, operated Associated Publishers, and pursued his own research and writing about African-American history. The home continued to serve as the national headquarters of the Association until the early 1970s.

Signage over the entrance of the house

The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976 but became vacant in the 1990s. In 2001, the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed the site on a list of "11 Most Endangered" historic properties. With advocacy by the NTHP, the DC Preservation League, community activists, and Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, the National Historic Site was authorized by Public Law 108-192 on December 19, 2003, and established by Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton on February 27, 2006. The property was acquired by the National Park Service in 2005. The home is still vacant and closed to the public but the rehabilitation of the home is currently being planned by the National Park Service in partnership with local architecture firm Beyer Blinder Belle.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. 
  2. ^ "Carter G. Woodson House". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-07-02. 

External links[edit]