Carus Lectures

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The Carus Lectures are a prestigious series of three lectures presented over three consecutive days in plenary sessions at a divisional meeting of the American Philosophical Association. The series was founded in 1925 with John Dewey as the inaugural presenter. The series was scheduled irregularly until 1995, when they were scheduled to occur every two years. The series is named in honor of Paul Carus by Mary Carus and is published by Open Court.[1] In his introduction to the inaugural speech, Hartley Burr Alexander praised the series as an unusual opportunity of presenting ideas "with no institutional atmosphere to further the free play of the mind upon all phases of life."[2]

Lecturers[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ O'Brien, Ken (October 23, 1994). Roots of Carus Corp. reach back to Germany. Chicago Tribune
  2. ^ Alexander Hartley Burr. Introduction. In Dewey, John (1925) Experience and Nature. Kessinger Publishing, reprint 2003, ISBN 978-0-7661-7320-0

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