Carver Theater (Washington, D.C.)

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Carver Theater
Carver Theater, First Home of the ANM.jpg
Carver Theater just before it opened as the Anacostia Community Museum, 1967
Carver Theater (Washington, D.C.) is located in Washington, D.C.
Carver Theater (Washington, D.C.)
Location within United States Washington, D.C.
General information
Type Office
Location Washington, D.C., United States
Coordinates 38°51′46″N 76°59′33″W / 38.862836°N 76.992508°W / 38.862836; -76.992508Coordinates: 38°51′46″N 76°59′33″W / 38.862836°N 76.992508°W / 38.862836; -76.992508
Completed 1948
Design and construction
Architect John Jacob Zink

The Carver Theater is a former movie theater located in the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D.C. in the United States.

History[edit]

The building opened in 1948 and is of the Streamline Moderne style of architecture. It was built by John Jacob Zink and held upwards of 500 people seated. The Carver Theater closed in the 1960s only to reopen in 1967 as the first home of the Anacostia Community Museum.[1] The museum moved from the theater in 1987.[2]

Currently, the theater is undergoing renovations to serve as a training center for the Good Samaritan Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by Art Monk.[3][4] In 2001, the city of Washington agreed to a 20-year lease with the organization. As of 2008, the building has undergone few renovations. Almost $1 million has been invested in the building through grants and donations. In 2004, the city sold the building to the foundation for $255,235 in the hope they would "restore and reoccupy Carver Theater."[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Carver Theatre". Anacostia. Cinema Treasures. Retrieved 21 April 2012. 
  2. ^ "Carver Theater, First Home of the ANM". 92-1790. Smithsonian Institution Archives. Retrieved 21 April 2012. 
  3. ^ a b McKenna, David. "Playing Catch-Up". Cheap Seats. Washington City Paper. Retrieved 21 April 2012. 
  4. ^ Garber, David. "The Carver Theater building". And Now, Anacostia. Retrieved 21 April 2012.