Cary Woodworth

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Cary Woodworth (born 1977) is an American actor and singer-songwriter.

Early life[edit]

Woodworth was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey. His mother is German and his father is American. Woodworth grew up in East Brunswick, New Jersey, graduated from East Brunswick High School. He holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Economics from Rutgers University.

Career[edit]

Woodworth made his film acting debut in the 1999 independent film,"The Money Shot" and appeared as Jeff in the made-for-television movie Mary and Rhoda in 2000. In 2004, Woodworth was cast opposite Edison Chen in the British/Chinese film Life Translated.[1][2] Through the Chinese premiere of the film, Woodworth began to learn Mandarin which he now speaks fluently.

In 2005, Woodworth co-starred in a series of Maybelline commercials with Adriana Lima and Zhang Ziyi which aired worldwide.

Woodworth created history in April 2006 by becoming the first foreign lead of a Mainland Chinese film when he was cast as an American war journalist in the historical drama China 1949.[3] The film centers on Woodworth's foreign correspondent character, as he struggles through war and politics to get to the truth of the events leading up to the Communist Party of China (CPC) victory against the Kuomintang (KMT) in the Chinese Civil War in 1949. Since then he has been cast as a lead role in two drama series for CCTV and leads in independent feature films.

Woodworth began writing songs and has recently been performing them in different cities across the United States.

Selected filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
2006 China 1949 Tom
2004 Life Translated Tom
2000 Mary and Rhoda Jeff
1999 The Money Shot

Trivia[edit]

In China, Woodworth was given the name 张云龙 by a master. He was first asked to choose the surname. The first name that came out was Zhāng (张). The master then gave him Yún (云) which means cloud, and Lóng (龙) which means dragon. Therefore his name means "Dragon in the Clouds".

He speaks German and Mandarin. Cary is left-handed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Catsoulis, Jeannette (2005-10-07). "New York Times". Life, Translated. Retrieved 2010-04-28. 
  2. ^ "Sina.com". 陈冠希妞妞Cary作客新浪聊《时差7小时》(组图). 2004-10-19. 
  3. ^ "Beijing Today". A fresh look at history. 2006-04-07. 

External links[edit]