Caryl M. Stern

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Caryl M. Stern
U.S. Fund for UNICEF C.E.O. Caryl M. Stern, Kenya field visit.jpg
U.S. Fund for UNICEF C.E.O. Caryl M. Stern, Kenya field visit
Born (1957-10-30) October 30, 1957 (age 56)
Westchester County, New York, United States
Nationality American
Education SUNY Oneonta, Western Illinois University, Loyola University
Known for U.S. Fund for UNICEF, child advocacy, human rights advocacy
Notable work(s) Hate Hurts: How Children Learn and Unlearn Prejudice

Caryl M. Stern (born October 30, 1957) is an American author, child advocate, civil and human rights activist, and non-profit executive.[1][2]

Early life[edit]

Stern was born to Edwin and Manuela Stern in Westchester County, New York. She has one sibling, her brother, Dr. Mitchell Stern.

Stern graduated from high school at age 16 and went on to receive her bachelor’s degree at the State University of New York at Oneonta, when she was 20. She received her master’s degree at Western Illinois University and pursued a doctorate in education at Loyola University Chicago.[2][3]

In her early career, Stern served in several leadership positions at Polytechnic University in Brooklyn, NY including Dean of Students from 1985-87.[2][4]

Anti-Defamation League[edit]

In 1987, Stern took a post with the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). There she headed A World of Difference, a diversity training and anti-bias project.[1][4][5][6] Stern was later promoted to director of the education division at the ADL and eventually chief operating officer (COO) and senior associate national director of the organization.[1][2]

In 2006, she left the ADL for the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, the oldest of the 36 National Committees that support the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and collectively raise about one-third of its annual income.[7]

U.S. Fund for UNICEF[edit]

Stern in 2013

Stern joined the U.S. Fund for UNICEF in 2006 as COO and served as acting president for a short time before assuming the role of president and CEO in May 2007.[2][8] In this role, she advocated for continued U.S. Government support of UNICEF[9][10] and headed the organization's efforts to raise awareness and revenue for UNICEF's efforts to aid children affected by disasters including the 2010 Haiti earthquake and the 2011 East Africa drought.[11][12][13][14] During her tenure, the U.S. Fund's revenues have increased from $372,131,340 in FY 2007 to $501,571,105 in FY 2012.[15][16]

Personal[edit]

Stern is married to real estate developer Donald LaRosa. They have three sons: Brian, Lee, and James.[1][3] Stern's compensation as president and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF is $454,855.[17]

Books and publications[edit]

Stern is the co-author of Hate Hurts: How Children Learn and Unlearn Prejudice and Future Perfect: A Model for Professional Development.[2] I Believe in Zero: Learning from the World's Children, a collection of Stern's accounts from areas affected by crisis, war, and disaster was published in 2013.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Musleah, Rahel. "Profile: Caryl Stern". Hadassah Magazine. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Caryl M. Stern". U.S. Fund for UNICEF. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Caryl M. Stern, Donald LaRosa". New York Times. May 3, 1993. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Interview: Caryl M. Stern <http://www.claudiachan.com/interviews/caryl-m-stern/>
  5. ^ A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE ® Institute - History and Development of A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE Institute
  6. ^ "Bertelsmann's Revisionist". The Nation. November 8, 1999. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  7. ^ "UNICEF National Committees". unicef.org. Retrieved February 6, 2013. 
  8. ^ Mohn, Tanya (August 8, 2008). "Making a Child’s Life Better in Every Corner". New York Times. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  9. ^ CARYL M. STERN ACTING PRESIDENT UNITED STATES FUND FOR, UNICEF. "Fiscal 2008 Appropriations: State, Foreign Operations & Other Programs." FDCH Congressional Testimony (03/29/2007): MasterFILE Premier. Web. 7 Feb. 2013
  10. ^ "EDITORIAL: Good news: Recent U.N. surveys record a dramatic, worldwide decrease in infant mortality.". Houston Chronicle. September 19, 2007. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  11. ^ Stern, Caryl (July 27, 2011). "Africa's Silent Starvation Crisis". Daily Beast. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  12. ^ "Americans less responsive to flood victims in Pakistan". USA Today. November 30, 2010. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "Off Media Radar, Famine Garners Few Donations". New York Times. August 1, 2011. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  14. ^ "The Forward Fifty: Caryl Stern". Jewish Daily Forward. October 2011. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  15. ^ "U.S. Fund for UNICEF Annual Report, 2007". 
  16. ^ "U.S. Fund for UNICEF Annual Report, 2012". 
  17. ^ "U.S. Fund FAQ CEO Salary". U.S. Fund for UNICEF. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  18. ^ Deahl, Rachel (19 March 2012). Publishers Weekly 259 (12). 

External links[edit]