Casey Nicholaw

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Casey Nicholaw
Born San Diego, California, United States

Casey Nicholaw (born 1962) is an American theatre director, choreographer and performer. He has been nominated for Tony Awards for directing and choreographing The Drowsy Chaperone (2006), for choreographing Monty Python's Spamalot (2005), and choreographing The Book of Mormon (2011), as well as winning for his co-direction the latter with Trey Parker. He also was nominated for the Drama Desk Awards for Outstanding Direction and Choreography for The Drowsy Chaperone (2006), and for Outstanding Choreography for Spamalot (2005).[1]

Biography[edit]

The oldest of three children, Nicholaw grew up in San Diego, California and performed in community theatre there as a teenager.[2] He graduated from Clairemont High School in 1980 and attended the University of California, Los Angeles.

Career[edit]

On Broadway, Nicholaw has directed and choreographed The Drowsy Chaperone (2006), choreographed Spamalot (2005) and directed To Be or Not to Be, which opened October 2, 2008, for the Manhattan Theatre Club.[3] He has been nominated for both Tony Awards and Drama Desk Awards for his Broadway work.[1] As a performer, he played the role of Junior and other roles in Crazy for You (musical) (1992–94); played Wall Street Wolf and other roles in The Best Little Whorehouse Goes Public (1994); played Gregor, Juke and other roles in Victor/Victoria (1995–97), played Corky, Luke and other roles in Steel Pier (1997); understudied and performed as Neville in The Scarlet Pimpernel (1999); played the role of Frank Manero in Saturday Night Fever (1999–2000); understudied the role of Horton and other roles in Seussical (2000–01); and played the role of Dexter, among other roles, in Thoroughly Modern Millie (2002–04). He can be heard on the cast album of most of these musicals.[4]

Nicholaw's other choreography credits include Follies for City Center's Encores! (Off-Broadway, 2007; he also directed this production); Spamalot's West End production and U.S. national tour (2006); The Drowsy Chaperone in Los Angeles (2005; as director and choreographer); South Pacific at Carnegie Hall (2005); Lucky Duck (Old Globe Theater, 2004) and Can-Can for Encores! (Off-Broadway, 2004). His other performing credits include Billion Dollar Baby (Off-Off-Broadway), for a Musicals in Mufti concert (1998) and Bells Are Ringing at the Goodspeed Opera House (1990).[4] He also choreographed Bye Bye Birdie (2002) for City Center Encores!; Sinatra: His Voice, His World, His Way at Radio City Music Hall; and Candide for the New York Philharmonic's series of Broadway concerts.[5]

In January 2009, Nicholaw was both director and choreographer of the Los Angeles debut of Minsky's, a musical based on the 1968 film The Night They Raided Minsky's, at the Ahmanson Theatre.[6][7]

Nicholaw directed and choreographed a new musical, Robin and the 7 Hoods, based on the 1960s Rat Pack film. The musical features songs by Sammy Cahn and James Van Heusen, and with a book by Rupert Holmes (replacing Peter Ackerman). The show played at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, California, from July 30, 2010 through August, with a cast that featured Will Chase and Amy Spanger.[8][9]

He is the director and choreographer for the musical Elf the Musical, which officially opened at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre on November 10, 2010 and closed on January 2, 2011.[10][11] He directed and choreographed the stage musical Aladdin which ran at the 5th Avenue Theatre, Seattle, Washington, July 7–31, 2011. It uses songs from the 1992 film Aladdin, with a new book by Chad Beguelin and new lyrics by Beguelin and Alan Menken. The show premiered on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theater on March 20, 2014.[12][13]

Nicholaw will direct Animal House: The Musical, which was to have featured an original score by multi-platinum selling band Barenaked Ladies (“One Week,” “Pinch Me”), but is now being composed by David Yazbek. Michael Mitnick will write the libretto for the stage production.[14] [15]

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