Cashmere, New Zealand

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Cashmere
Cashmere is located in New Zealand Christchurch
Cashmere
Cashmere
Coordinates: 43°34′22″S 172°37′52″E / 43.572751°S 172.631100°E / -43.572751; 172.631100Coordinates: 43°34′22″S 172°37′52″E / 43.572751°S 172.631100°E / -43.572751; 172.631100
Area
 • Total 15.3003 km2 (5.9075 sq mi)
Population (2006)
 • Total 6,876
 • Density 450/km2 (1,200/sq mi)

The suburb of Cashmere rises above the southern end of the city of Christchurch in New Zealand’s South Island.

Geography[edit]

Cashmere is situated on the north side of the Port Hills, immediately above the southern terminus of Christchurch’s main street, Colombo Street. Five kilometres south of the city centre, a commanding view of the city can be had from Victoria Park, at the upper end of the suburb. Above Victoria Park is Sugarloaf, a 496 m peak, which is the location of the 119 m transmission tower for local radio and TV stations.

History[edit]

John Cracroft Wilson in 1878

Cashmere takes its name from Sir John Cracroft Wilson's farm, which originally occupied the present suburb. Wilson was born in India and named his farm after Kashmir (Cashmere is an early British spelling of Kashmir).[1] The house Wilson built for his Indian workers is today a function centre known as The Old Stone House (currently under repair after the Canterbury earthquakes).

Cashmere has a reputation as one of the country's more well-to-do and refined suburbs, and the 2006 census revealed there was generally a higher income concentration in the suburb.

Buildings[edit]

Sign of the Kiwi
Dame Ngaio Marsh's Home

Two of Harry Ell's rest houses, the Sign of the Takahe and the Sign of the Kiwi, are located in Cashmere. Both are Category I heritage buildings.[2][3] Dame Ngaio Marsh's former house in Valley Road is a museum run in her memory. It is registered by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust as a Category I heritage item.[4]

Schools include Cashmere Primary School and Cashmere High School. Princess Margaret Hospital, built in 1959, was once thought to become the main hospital of Christchurch, but it was too far from the central city.[5]

The Cashmere Club is home to many local sports groups including rugby, soccer, bowls, badminton, darts, squash and small bore rifle shooting.

The Canterbury Ring Laser facility is located in the Cracroft Caverns, an underground bunker complex built during World War II.

Notable residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kristiansen, Tessa. "Wilson, John Cracroft - Biography". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 10 July 2011. 
  2. ^ "Sign of the Takahe". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 10 July 2011. 
  3. ^ "Sign of the Kiwi". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 10 July 2011. 
  4. ^ "Ngaio Marsh House". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 10 July 2011. 
  5. ^ "Cashmere (later Princess Margaret) Hospital, shown under construction". Christchurch City Libraries. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 
  6. ^ Stafford, Jane. "Marsh, Edith Ngaio 1895 - 1982". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 10 July 2011. 

External links[edit]