Castle of Park

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Castle of Park
Castle of Park Glenluce exterior.JPG
Castle of Park is located in Dumfries and Galloway
Castle of Park
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Location within Dumfries and Galloway
General information
Type Tower house
Town or city Glenluce
Country Scotland
Coordinates 54°52′33″N 4°49′32″W / 54.875972°N 4.825551°W / 54.875972; -4.825551Coordinates: 54°52′33″N 4°49′32″W / 54.875972°N 4.825551°W / 54.875972; -4.825551
Construction started 1590
Completed Before 1599

The Castle of Park is a 16th-century L-plan tower house near Glenluce, in Dumfries and Galloway, southwest Scotland. It is a category A listed building.[1]

History[edit]

The castle was begun in 1590 for Thomas Hay, the son of one of the Commendators of Glenluce Abbey, and his wife Jonet MakDouel.[2] It was completed by 1599.[3]

The building was extended in the 18th century,[2] and was used by the Hay family until Sir John Dalrymple-Hay sold the Park estate in 1875;[1] it was then left uninhabited.

A program of restoration was carried out in the 1950s and 1960s by the Ministry of Public Buildings and Works, including removal of the 18th-century wings.[2] In the 1980s, additional work was done by the Landmark Trust.[3] The building is now maintained using income from its use as holiday accommodation.[4]

At various times the building has also been known as "Park Hay", "The Park O' Luce", "Park Castle" and "Park House".[2]

Description[edit]

The building is divided into four floors. The lowest floor consists of three barrel vaulted rooms used as kitchens and store-rooms; above this is the main hall measuring some 22 feet (6.7 m) by 17 feet (5.2 m).[5] The third and fourth floors are divided into smaller rooms. The southward projection contains a large spiral staircase, from which a further spiral stair leads to the roof and to a small room above the main stair.[3]

Although imposing, the building is not defensible.[3] Unlike earlier examples such as Drum Castle,[6] the walls are hollowed out with additional staircases and, to quote the 1898 description, "commodious closets".[5]

References[edit]

The doorway inscription, which reads:
"Blissit be the name of the Lord this werk was begun the first day of March 1590 be Thomas Hay of Park and Jonet MakDouel his spous"
  1. ^ a b "Castle of Park". Historic Scotland. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Glenluce, Castle of Park". CANMORE. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. 
  3. ^ a b c d Gifford, John (1996). Dumfries and Galloway. The Buildings of Scotland. Penguin Books. pp. 176–177. ISBN 0-14-071067-1. 
  4. ^ "About the Landmark Trust". Retrieved 2010-09-29. 
  5. ^ a b Reproduced in "Park O' Luce, Wigtonshire". Examples of Scottish architecture from the 12th to the 17th century; a series of reproductions from the National art survey drawings 1. G. Waterston & Sons. 1921. 
  6. ^ Simpson, W D (1959). Scottish Castles - An introduction to the Castles of Scotland. Edinburgh: Her Majesty's Stationery Office. 

External links[edit]