Cat Run

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Cat Run
Cat Run FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed by John Stockwell
Produced by Bill Perkins
Ram Bergman
Derrick Borte
Written by Nick Ball
John Niven
Starring Paz Vega
Janet McTeer
Alphonso McAuley
Scott Mechlowicz
Christopher McDonald
Karel Roden
D. L. Hughley
Tony Curran
Michelle Lombardo
Music by Devin Powers
Cinematography Jean-François Hensgens
Edited by Ben Callahan
Production
  company
Lleju Productions
Distributed by Eagle Films
Release date(s)
  • April 1, 2011 (2011-04-01)[1]
Running time 102 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $30,000 (US)[2]

Cat Run is a 2011 American action film directed by John Stockwell.

Plot[edit]

The Andorran hooker and single mother Catalina "Cat" Rona is hired to participate in an orgy in Montenegro with other escorts and powerful men and the American Senator William Krebb. Something goes wrong with the politician and all the girls are murdered by the security of the host to avoid witnesses. However, Cat escapes and brings a hard disk drive with classified information with her. There is a manhunt for Cat and the cruel assassin Helen Bingham is hired to retrieve the HDD and kill Cat. Meanwhile, the Americans Julian Simms and Anthony Hester decide to open a detective agency to raise money. When they read in the newspaper that Cat is being chased, they decide to seek her out, expecting to receive a reward. However, they cross the path of Helen and they end protecting Cat from the killer. When Helen is betrayed by those who hired her, she decides to help Anthony, Julian, and Cat retrieve the HDD and their freedom.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Cat Run was shot in Serbia and Montenegro.[1]

Release[edit]

Cat Run was released April 1, 2011. It grossed $30,000 domestically.[2] Universal released it on home video on June 19, 2012.[3]

Reception[edit]

Rotten Tomatoes, a review aggregator, reports that 14% of 14 surveyed critics gave the film a positive review; the average rating was 3.6/10.[4] Metacritic rated it 33/100 based on nine reviews.[5] John Anderson of Variety called it "an often stylish but wearying action thriller that fails even to be convincingly tongue-in-cheek."[6] Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter called it "a self-consciously sleazy comic crime saga composed of facetious elements whose shelf life has long since passed."[1] Mark Olsen of the Los Angeles Times called it a return to "late-'90s post-Tarantino crime thrillers" that are "cut-rate knockoffs" of Quentin Tarantino's style.[7] Scott Tobias of The A.V. Club rated it C+ and called it a "generic 'hip' thriller" that is well-suited to late-night cable.[8] Gerard Iribe of DVD Talk rated it 1.5/5 stars and called it "the poor man's version of Smokin' Aces".[3] Paul Pritchard of DVD Verdict wrote, "It lacks a unique voice, and though it does entertain in bursts, it is overlong and frequently guilty of lacking direction."[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c McCarthy, Todd (2011-03-22). "Cat Run: Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  2. ^ a b "Cat Run". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  3. ^ a b Gerard Iribe (2012-06-12). "Cat Run (Blu-ray)". DVD Talk. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  4. ^ "Cat Run (2011)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  5. ^ "Cat Run". Metacritic. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  6. ^ Anderson, John (2011-04-03). "Review: 'Cat Run'". Variety. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  7. ^ Olsen, Mark (2011-04-01). "Movie review: 'Cat Run'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  8. ^ Tobias, Scott (2011-05-31). "Cat Run". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 
  9. ^ Pritchard, Paul (2012-06-15). "Cat Run (Blu-ray)". DVD Verdict. Retrieved 2014-04-06. 

External links[edit]