Catharine Cox Miles

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Catharine Morris Cox Miles (May 20, 1890 – October 11, 1984) [1] was an American psychologist known for her work on intelligence and genius.

Born in San Jose, CA, to Lydia Shipley Bean and Charles Ellwood Cox. Catharine Cox earned a PhD from Stanford University and in 1927 married psychologist Walter R. Miles.

She was a professor of clinical psychology at the Yale Medical School and affiliated with Yale's Institute of Human Relations. Earlier she worked at Stanford with Stanford-Binet creator Lewis Terman in issues related to IQ. She is also known for her historiometric study (1926) of IQ estimates of three hundred prominent figures who lived prior to IQ testing, a work which was one of the earliest attempts to apply social scientific methods to the study of genius and greatness.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sears, Robert R. (1986). "Catherine Cox Miles: 1890–1984". The American Journal of Psychology (University of Illinois Press) 99 (3): 431–433. JSTOR 1422495. 
  • Cox CM. Early Mental Traits of Three Hundred Geniuses. (Genetic Studies of Genius Series) 1926: Stanford University Press, ISBN 0-8047-0010-9.
  • Cox, C. M. (1976). A dossier on Charlotte Brontë. In W. W. Dennis & M. Dennis (Eds.), The intellectually gifted (pp. 47–50). New York: Grune & Stratton. (Original work published 1926)
  • Cox, C. M. (1976). Excerpts from the early writings of geniuses selected and arranged by Lewis M. Terman. In W. W. Dennis & M. Dennis (Eds.), The intellectually gifted (pp. 25–45). New York: Grune & Stratton. (Original work published 1926)
  • Cox, C. M. (1976). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. In W. W. Dennis & M. Dennis (Eds.), The intellectually gifted (pp. 17–24). New York: Grune & Stratton. (Original work published 1926)
  • Cox, C. M. (1983). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. In R. S. Albert (Ed.), Genius and eminence (pp. 46–51). Oxford: Pergamon. (Original work published 1926)
  • Miles CC. The Rôle of Individual Psychological Difference in Social Psychology. Social Forces 15 (1937): 469–472.
  • Walter R. and Catharine Cox Miles Papers via Archives of the History of American Psychology

Further reading[edit]

  • Robinson, Andrew (2010). Sudden Genius?: The Gradual Path to Creative Breakthroughs. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-956995-3. Lay summary (24 November 2010). 

External links[edit]