Cathedral of Hope (Pittsburgh)

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East Liberty Presbyterian Church
Cathedral of Hope
View from Penn Avenue
Location

East Liberty Neighborhood

Pittsburgh, PA
Country United States
Denomination Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
Website www.cathedralofhope.org
History
Founded 1819
Dedicated 1935
Architecture
Architect(s) Ralph Adams Cram
Style Gothic Revival
Specifications
Nave length 202 feet
Width across transepts 117 feet
Nave height 75 feet
Tower height 300 feet
Administration
Presbytery Pittsburgh Presbytery
Clergy
Pastor(s)

Rev. Dr. Randall K. Bush

Rev. Heather Schoenewolf
Laity
Organist/Director of music Dr. Edward Alan Moore
Music group(s) Hope Academy

East Liberty Presbyterian Church, also known as the Cathedral of Hope, is in the East Liberty neighborhood of the East End of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. The current building is the fifth church building to occupy the site; the first was in 1819.

The church, built in the Gothic style, was built between 1932 and 1935 with a donation from Richard Beatty Mellon (1858–1933) as a memorial to his parents, Thomas Mellon (1813–1908) and Sarah Jane Negley, who were active members of the church. The principal architect was Ralph Adams Cram (1863–1942). Among the distinctions of the Cathedral of Hope are the representation of distinctly Reformed themes in statuary created by John Angel (sculptor)[1] and Charles Connick designed stained glass. Notably, one stained glass window contains an image of Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, an ardent Presbyterian. Angel did the Last Supper group in marble.[2]

The pipe organ in the church was also a gift of Richard Mellon, and it was built as Opus # 884 by the Boston firm of Æolian-Skinner.[3] The organ was very large for its time, although not unprecedented for buildings the size of East Liberty Presbyterian Church. The organ comprised eight divisions, including a six-rank string organ. The Indianapolis organ building firm of Goulding & Wood, Inc. completed an extensive renovation of the organ, completing the work in October 2007.[4] The instrument now contains 120 ranks, with restoration work still to be done on the two antiphonal divisions in the rear gallery.

In addition to the main sanctuary, the church's campus includes an architecturally similar chapel, a garth used for church services during summer months, extensive administrative offices, a large music rehearsal suite, a basketball court, and a duck-pin bowling alley. The congregation sponsors a men's shelter, providing temporary shelter, meals, and job training.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Art: Gothic, with a Difference" (paid subscription required). TIME Magazine. June 2, 1947. Retrieved September 7, 2012. 
  2. ^ "John Angel". Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951. University of Glasgow History of Art and HATII, online database. 2011. Retrieved September 6, 2012. 
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ [2]

Further reading[edit]

  • Toker, Franklin (1986, 1994). Pittsburgh: An Urban Portrait. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. ISBN 0-8229-5434-6. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°27′39.7″N 79°55′32.2″W / 40.461028°N 79.925611°W / 40.461028; -79.925611