Catherine Clark

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Not to be confused with Katherine Clark.
Catherine Clark
CatherineClark2003.jpg
Catherine Clark in 2003
Born Catherine Jane Clark
(1976-11-06) November 6, 1976 (age 38)
High River, Alberta, Canada
Citizenship Canadian
Occupation Television broadcaster
Spouse(s) Chad Schella (m. 2002)
Children 2
Parents Joe Clark
Maureen McTeer

Catherine Jane Clark (born November 6, 1976) is a Canadian television broadcaster, and the daughter of former Canadian Prime Minister Joe Clark and Maureen McTeer.

Life and career[edit]

Clark was born in High River, Alberta in 1976, the same year her father first became leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. When she was 18, she moved alone to Paris to attend the American University for five months, and lived in a tiny one-bedroom flat.[1] She graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in art history. After graduating, she worked at the publicity firm Hill & Knowlton.[2]

She played a prominent role in the federal election of 2000,[2] and was credited by her father as one of his most trusted political advisors. She has been an advocate for engaging youth in the political process.[citation needed]

In 2001, she began a career in broadcasting, hosting a television news magazine, Unzipped, for the new Canadian digital cable network ichannel. The show was cancelled the following year due to financial constraints and questionable content at the network, but Clark continued to work for the network in other capacities. In 2004, she joined Rogers Television as host of a daily talk show in Ottawa.

On June 8, 2002, Clark married Chad Schella, formerly the Director of Player Services for the NHL Ottawa Senators. They have a daughter, Alexandra Charmaine Maureen Schella, born on May 26, 2006 and a son, Charles Roger Dennis Schella, born April 1, 2009. Clark took some time off from television after her daughter's birth, and subsequently joined CPAC, the Canadian parliamentary broadcaster. With CPAC, she has hosted Sunday Sound Off, a political debate and panel discussion show, and Beyond Politics, a talk show where she interviews Canadian politicians in depth about their lives outside of politics.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McRae, Earl. "Not just another pretty face". Ottawa Sun. Retrieved October 19, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Catherine on the campaign trail". CBC News. October 29, 2000. Retrieved October 19, 2014. 
  3. ^ "A Leader in Her Own Right". Ottawa Life Magazine. January 30, 2014. Retrieved October 19, 2014.